Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 75

Thread: Writing Lyrics

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    928
    Thanks
    156
    Thanked 106 Times in 103 Posts
    Rep Power
    2383179
    Sign in to disable this ad
    [QUOTE=andrushkiwt;4493798]Freud-alert : Maybe she was talking about YOU!

    LOL !!! Yeah........could be. As Ive mentioned before........shes a psychologist. For all I know.......she has secretly programmed every lyric Ive written for a while.......including the song I wrote specifically for her. Now.......if she could only play drums.......
    Just A Song Writer..........

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    4,091
    Thanks
    913
    Thanked 561 Times in 522 Posts
    Rep Power
    2826414
    Quote Originally Posted by kickingtone View Post
    Dude, you got what it takes! Keep up the good work!!
    Really though, I liked it. lol. Especially the final line. My thought process is, we really don't ever know what the writer is writing about anyway, no matter how much it seems like we think we do. So, if no one truly understands our subject matter, why not write what we are feeling at that time? In some way, it connects. It's a screenshot of how we feel at that moment, as we're writing words down to a particular melody and musical theme.

    ---------- Update ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Mickster View Post
    Now.......if she could only play drums.......
    insert drummer joke here
    "No healthy person waits in line with a slew of geriatrics on a Sunday morning for pancakes" - RFR https://soundcloud.com/andrushkiwt

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,537
    Thanks
    284
    Thanked 822 Times in 718 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470742
    Quote Originally Posted by kickingtone View Post
    It means...

    "The darkness falls quickly,..."

    The blindness spreads unchecked...

    "...children call your name,..."

    ...and the generations ahead will accuse us...

    "...we break bread with stones..."

    ...as we scramble in our blindness for peace through war...

    "...your colors are all the same..."

    ...unaccepting of our differences.

    Dude, you got what it takes! Keep up the good work!!


    If I believed that most listeners would have that level of interpretive ability...maybe I would feel comfortable writing those kind of lyrics...but I just don't think they do, and I don't know if I like the idea that everyone thinks it means something different...that they totally miss the cryptic "message".

    Back in my early days, when I was doing the creative writing classes and all that...I would churn out that kind of babel effortlessly, because I would hear those kind of lyrics in some songs...but I started wondering WTF it was really about, because I would try too hard to interpret what the heck the other writers were saying, and it made me rethink what I was trying to say in my own stuff.

    I still like good symbolism and imagery in lyrics...I just like it to be a bit more accessible. It's too easy to just string weird stuff together. I find it much harder to make things understandable, but clever and interesting. That takes more work, IMO.
    TBH...I'm often stuck on lyrics...and I'm tempted to just let whatever flow out, and not give a damn how understandable it is to every single person...but then I pull back and keep working the lyrics.

    I think if I was writing what was intended to be what we use to call "head" music...like way back in the day, Pink Floyd, Uriah Heep, King Crimson, etc...I would feel more comfortable about writing "head" lyrics...but when working on more basic, mainstream Pop/Rock stuff, I feel the lyrics have to also be more basic and mainstream.
    I dunno...maybe it's chic-n-cool to be abstract even for those genres...people then think you're a very clever writer when they don't understand WTF you are writing about.
    At least I would have one fan here.

    Clever is good...too clever sounds contrived, IMO.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to miroslav For This Useful Post:


  5. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Lowell Street Studio, New England
    Posts
    12,093
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 558 Times in 531 Posts
    Rep Power
    18632360
    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    :lI think if I was writing what was intended to be what we use to call "head" music...like way back in the day, Pink Floyd, Uriah Heep, King Crimson, etc...I would feel more comfortable about writing "head" lyrics...but when working on more basic, mainstream Pop/Rock stuff, I feel the lyrics have to also be more basic and mainstream.
    I dunno...maybe it's chic-n-cool to be abstract even for those genres...people then think you're a very clever writer when they don't understand WTF you are writing about.
    At least I would have one fan here.

    Clever is good...too clever sounds contrived, IMO.
    I'm with Miro here. But it seems like the majority of people here (or least responding on this thread) are not 'lyrics are important' people - many previous threads have shown this. I fall into the rock/pop/singer-songwriter category (yeah, that's pretty wide), and the lyrics ALWAYS come first. However, I often write them, then they go in a folder. Then I'll be noodling on guitar or keys and come up with something that shows promise, and I'll go for that folder and see if anything I've penned before fits it.
    Mike B My new album on CD Baby: Fact and Fiction
    My Bandcamp site: http://mikebirchmusic.bandcamp.com

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    248
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    463285
    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post


    If I believed that most listeners would have that level of interpretive ability...maybe I would feel comfortable writing those kind of lyrics...but I just don't think they do, and I don't know if I like the idea that everyone thinks it means something different...that they totally miss the cryptic "message".
    If the lyrics are not obvious, I think most people would ignore them until they are told by "scholars" or some "insider" what they are supposed to mean.

    I guess the trick is to get some interviews about your work and use that to start spouting nonsense clues about "what it all means"... Then leave it to the scholars and critics to do your PR.

    It's probably a good idea to relax the edge off the "clever" by adding colloquialisms and rhetorical questions into the lyrics. Also adds mystique.

    It is amazingly easy to join what looks like disjointed dots. For example, in the play Hanzel and Gretel, when the children ran out of stones in the darkness of the woods, they broke bread to make crumbs... but their tracks disappeared (colours all the same).... You could just as easily convince somebody it's all about that!

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to kickingtone For This Useful Post:


  8. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    4,091
    Thanks
    913
    Thanked 561 Times in 522 Posts
    Rep Power
    2826414
    Quote Originally Posted by kickingtone View Post
    If the lyrics are not obvious, I think most people would ignore them until they are told by "scholars" or some "insider" what they are supposed to mean.

    It is amazingly easy to join what looks like disjointed dots.
    For once, I agree with you. woohoo!

    So, if I'm writing something at any particular moment, those things I'm writing are somehow linked since it's a snapshot of what I'm feeling/thinking at that time, even if it seems unrelated. At least I like to think so, anyway.

    Another point is that I like to try and switch up the "anticipated" points - "did" when "didn't" when normally go there, or switching pronouns is another one. Did I use too many "I's"? Then I'll go with "we" here instead. I'll even do it if it compromises the "message" or theme.

    I don't like tinkering with lyrics too much, and I truthfully look at it like the most agonizing and un-fun part of putting songs together. I'd rather comp vocals, to be honest. Lately, I've been struggling with being able to settle with my word choices. That's never been an issue for me, so I'm a little concerned about it since I have a tune to write lyrics for before I record vocals Monday. I'm attributing it to the place in life that I'm at, though that's getting a little personal. I'm recently engaged to the love of my life, finances are great, in a doctorate program for primary care provider, and health is good. I cannot write when I'm happy. I have always used music and writing to ease any emotional pain or sadness. It's like, I don't know what to do and I'm starting over. I have to learn to make stuff up or something, or use some scenario from the past.

    But - if I listen to something old that I wrote, I can't say I've ever thought "ugh, poor word choice there". I know I gave it a heartfelt attempt. Maybe that'll ease my anxiety about writing lyrics this weekend.
    "No healthy person waits in line with a slew of geriatrics on a Sunday morning for pancakes" - RFR https://soundcloud.com/andrushkiwt

  9. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,537
    Thanks
    284
    Thanked 822 Times in 718 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470742
    I think most songwriters write about stuff they are feeling and thinking about to some degree. Translating that to accessible lyrics so that the audience can empathize with you, is the hard part. If they are just disjointed thoughts that only make sense to you (OK, some writers do that, and not care about anyone else understanding it)...it forces the audience to invent some meaning.
    I like the idea of a listener personalizing my lyrics and applying them to their world...but I don't like the idea of their interpretation to be something 180 degrees off from what the song is actually about.
    So that's the line...keeping it personal but also making it accessible without losing the meaning.

    That said...I know some songs are intentionally meaningless...or so cryptic that you can apply any meaning to them and it still "makes sense" to each different interpretation.

    I hate movies that don't have a clear ending (unless there's going to be Part 2). It feels like they got that far, and then couldn't decide if they should kill off the cousin or let her live...so they end it vague, and it feels like a rip-off.
    It's rare when a vague ending is rewarding to watch....where you really enjoy the fact they didn't do a clear ending.

  10. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    248
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    463285
    I don't know if this works with lyrics, but I recall reading a book that was originally written/told in an African language, but translated very literally into English. It was poetry from beginning to end!

    Languages that do not have anywhere near the amount of vocabulary as English tend to be full of idiom. And they tend to be pitched at just the right level -- not clever sounding, yet evocative. So, if you have the cultural background, you can write some pretty seasoned poetry just by using literal translation.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to kickingtone For This Useful Post:


  12. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6,611
    Thanks
    285
    Thanked 459 Times in 428 Posts
    Rep Power
    12977802
    I usually do this sort of things when I don't have a complete set of lyrics, as you search for words that will go with the beat of the song. I mainly do this for phrasing and come back to bring the words into something that can be understood. But babbling at the beginning of a new song is something I do a lot. But I already have an idea where I want the song to go and can use the babel to help me fin the right words.

    I am a lyrics matters guy. If my words aren't saying something, then for me I have no reason to make the song. Except for instrumentals, then I try to build a some sort of "silent" movie. I try not to be too cryptic, just enough to be interesting, but not too cleaver, not that I could anyway.
    DM60 Tunes: The Collection

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to DM60 For This Useful Post:


  14. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,537
    Thanks
    284
    Thanked 822 Times in 718 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470742
    Quote Originally Posted by DM60 View Post
    I usually do this sort of things when I don't have a complete set of lyrics, as you search for words that will go with the beat of the song. I mainly do this for phrasing and come back to bring the words into something that can be understood. But babbling at the beginning of a new song is something I do a lot. But I already have an idea where I want the song to go and can use the babel to help me fin the right words.

    I am a lyrics matters guy. If my words aren't saying something, then for me I have no reason to make the song. Except for instrumentals, then I try to build a some sort of "silent" movie. I try not to be too cryptic, just enough to be interesting, but not too cleaver, not that I could anyway.
    Yeah...same here. If I didn't think lyrics matter, I would not spend hours, days sometimes...with my rhyming dictionary and Thesaurus, and lot of paper and pencils and erasers. I go through a lot of pencils.
    I'll maybe find a word that rhymes, and works with the overall cadence...but the meaning is stupid. Now, these are the times where I think about just saying "fuck it" and tossing in some abstract line, just because it works with the rhyme and rhythm. Just so I can move on and get the lyrics out of the way.
    I'll even write it down, and try to convince myself that it "works"...but then I come back to it, and realize it's just way too cryptic or too clever or just too lazy...and I'll erase and start from scratch.

    AFA instrumentals...they are, IMO, so much more easier to deal with. 1.) You don't have to come up with lyrics, and 2.) you don't have to mix around a lead vocal. So there's way more freedom to do things and not have a need for them to make sense, to mean something...or to figure out technically how to make them all work in the mix. Without lyrics and vocals, the instruments all become somewhat free to "move"...and there's many ways you can go when you don't have that central vocal w/lyrics to work everything else around. There's less worry about the instruments fighting the vocals and allowing the lyrics to be understood.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to miroslav For This Useful Post:


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Writing lyrics to an existing song bed
    By Rokket in forum Song Writing & Composition
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-23-2010, 04:16
  2. Writing lyrics
    By ido1957 in forum Song Writing & Composition
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 06-11-2009, 08:59
  3. Writing Lyrics for the Music
    By ido1957 in forum Song Writing & Composition
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-11-2008, 15:42
  4. First Time Writing Lyrics
    By bsr2002 in forum Vocal Technique & Processing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-19-2004, 01:06
  5. writing lyrics......
    By mbuster in forum Vocal Technique & Processing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-14-2003, 14:18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •