Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Vocal recording technique question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Vocal recording technique question

    Sign in to disable this ad
    Hey Guys,
    Newbie here, looks like a great place to learn some new stuff.

    Just wondering, if I was to fabricate a Mic mount for 2 condenser mics, so they were close and pretty much unified in location, running them thru 2 separate mic pres, both with phase switches, and then recorded to 2 separate tracks, do you think it would work ?
    Are there any major problems I would face ?

    Thanks for any feedback,
    JS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    The Derby City
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 24 Times in 21 Posts
    Rep Power
    24147
    Is this what you are thinking about?
    31c1nvyydbl-jpg

    There are several companies that make bars for setting mics up in things like ORTF, XY or Blumlein. They are useful for recording choirs, acoustic guitars, etc. to give a nice stereo image. Two channels, two mics, one stand and hit record. Cost run from $10 for very basic ones, to $100+ for more elaborate devices.

    The trick is learning what the various micing techniques are and then deciding what result you want. Sometimes its trial and error, but after a while you'll probably find what works best for your recording situations.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Lowell Street Studio, New England
    Posts
    12,178
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 574 Times in 546 Posts
    Rep Power
    18632360
    For vocals, there's no point in doing it unless you have two mics with specific different sounds. You are talking about a single point source of sound, so both mics will pick up the same sound, assuming they are close together. I've done it with 2 stands, two different mics to see if one mic was better than the other for my voice. With a pop filter and both mics about 2" back - I didn't want to go further because one was an SM58, the other an LDC. The sound was minimally different, but what I expected. I only used one track in the mix.
    Mike B My new album on CD Baby: Fact and Fiction
    My Bandcamp site: http://mikebirchmusic.bandcamp.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    50
    Posts
    19,583
    Thanks
    990
    Thanked 729 Times in 653 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474864
    Mono source is always going to be mono. However if you are looking to mic an instrument in a good room that needs some depth, then by all means try that.

    It is not typically used for vocals so much. There is not so much 'stereo image' to capture unless you are in a theater. Then there is a room to be recorded.

    Though never a bad idea to experiment.

    My advice would be to stay away from the reverse phase with 2 mics thing for vocals. You can get the same with your DAW.

    1 good mic for vocals and nail it.
    PC Win7-64-24G i7-4790k/Cubase 9 Pro 64-bit/2-Steinberg UR824's/ADAM A7x/Event TR8/SS Trigger Plat Deluxe/Melodyne 4 Studio/Other things that don't mean anything if a client shows up not knowing what it wants.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    7,849
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 499 Times in 462 Posts
    Rep Power
    14818761
    Quote Originally Posted by jimmys69 View Post
    My advice would be to stay away from the reverse phase with 2 mics thing for vocals. You can get the same with your DAW.
    Except it could be useful for auditioning the combination of the two mics live. Polarity is polarity, so it's a completely reversible (heh) process, unlike compression etc.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to bouldersoundguy For This Useful Post:


  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    50
    Posts
    19,583
    Thanks
    990
    Thanked 729 Times in 653 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474864
    Quote Originally Posted by bouldersoundguy View Post
    Except it could be useful for auditioning the combination of the two mics live. Polarity is polarity, so it's a completely reversible (heh) process, unlike compression etc.
    Absolutely. And I have been there and done that.

    Not often that I have used both mics. But in competition, one may be better.

    In my personal experience, (after trying multiple condenser and dynamics) I have just gone with one mic and pre for vocals. SM7b with Vintech X731 just works for every singer I have recorded since. Maybe I am lazy? Or tired of trying to find better than what just works?

    Others may have completely different experiences. There is no one perfect mic or room for anything.
    PC Win7-64-24G i7-4790k/Cubase 9 Pro 64-bit/2-Steinberg UR824's/ADAM A7x/Event TR8/SS Trigger Plat Deluxe/Melodyne 4 Studio/Other things that don't mean anything if a client shows up not knowing what it wants.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    7,849
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 499 Times in 462 Posts
    Rep Power
    14818761
    I agree that one mic should be fine. The trick is to find the right mic then find a preamp that works with it. It's rare that two mics are better than one, though I have done that on some instruments.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Hey Guys,
    Thanks for all the feedback, just got back to check in.
    I always double track my guitars so I thought why not try something new on Vocals.
    I've got 2 Condenser Mics with different freq responses, 2 different tube Mic pres, so I was thinking I might get a fatter mixed final track.
    We're all a bit of a Mad Scientist, ...no ?

    Thanks again, I'll be reading it all over again.

    JS

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    14,405
    Thanks
    61
    Thanked 610 Times in 557 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474864
    Mad scientist is all the reason to try however many mics you can. Vary the distance with each mic. Maybe have one as a main mic, the other pointed at a reflecting wall. Capture the whole room kinda thing.

    As far as what you described in your first post, it's kinda meh. As others have said, you'll probably pick just one track to use. To find something significantly different in sound, you gotta significantly change something. Side by side probably won't be much of a change from one mic to the other. For guitar, it makes sense to stereo mic it because different sections of a guitar sound different. But for a singer, it's basically one sound source.

    Still, fun to experiment.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    It's all good !
    Thanks so much for the heads up on possible issues and tips, and possible processing ideas.

    JS

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Vocal recording technique help
    By benherron.rrr in forum Vocal Technique & Processing
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-29-2010, 18:19
  2. Recording technique and vocal Q
    By midwesttribune in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-18-2007, 11:21
  3. Vocal FX technique recording
    By newbieatthis in forum Cool Edit Pro / Adobe Audition Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-25-2005, 21:52
  4. Vocal Recording Technique
    By tmcbrinn in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-01-2001, 23:45
  5. vocal/mic/recording technique
    By LI Slim in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-09-2001, 06:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •