Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Use Computer Software or Stand Alone Recorders?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    999
    Thanks
    187
    Thanked 118 Times in 111 Posts
    Rep Power
    2383179
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Each to his own of course........but.......it seems to me that people who disliked computers from the start or never got a lot of exposure or training on them are more likely to avoid a DAW. Conversely...........younger people who might have been "raised" on computers would think that older push button stuff is crazy and limited. I'm not doing a "younger vs older" thing here. Just making a few observations. As for analog.......vs digital........and tape vs digital.......well........in my experience having begun with an old Fostex X-15 (tape).......over the years to a DAW (using 3 different Tascams and a Zoom standalone in between).......the flexibility of the DAW is miles ahead of any standalone with quality to match. Can you point out one or 2 characteristics of a standalone that a DAW can't match........sure......but can you point out MANY characteristics of a DAW that a standalone can't match......absolutely. If you like or need to push buttons.......add a control surface to your DAW and you'll be happy.

    I keep hearing this viewpoint that a DAW is "distracting" and thereby inhibits creativity. For me it's the opposite. As I compose and then create.....I know up front how far I can go with my ideas and can incorporate them in the creation process and the anticipation of all that is VERY motivating.

    If your needs and goals and expressions and compositions are 100% compatible with a standalone......that's great. No one should tell you to go in another direction. But.......are you comfortable telling yourself that a new idea one day.......might not be do-able on your standalone? Sort of like saying to yourself.......well......I'll probably never get any better at creating.

    Before you all bomb me.......these are just my opinions and I've been on both sides of this debate at one time or another. No matter what.......recording is about the love of it and the creation is about the love of that too.
    Just A Song Writer..........

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    347
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by skywaveTDR View Post
    There are many people that are sick of the digital way that recordings are made. They seem to have no character to the recordings. If tape decks were so far an old thing I would not have over 200 of them here to be repaired or calibrated. They do a wonderful job while computers over complicate things and often times get people in over their heads so they lose focus on the recording they are trying to make and get all stressed out. I had to often help people in real studios at Radio Stations as Chief Engineer where a button would get pressed and the setting change all over the place in a suite of software. There are many hidden buttons in computer software that can send you down the wrong path.
    Tape recorders and mixers are just much simpler to deal with and much better with transients and overloads that computes crap out totally with.
    Take an overall perspective to the two fields before deciding which way to go. Many of my clients say they have had DAWs and are done with them. They did not need any prompting from me.

    Keep in mind that most U tube videos are made by people with the most basic knowledge of a subject and try and to pass themselves off as some kind of expert. I have watched many videos and the last one was laughable as the guy was fixing an audio problem by resoldering a wire onto an erase head which has nothing to do with the play function. Of course the stupid audience does not know this- he is shoveling crap as 96% of them are.


    A few people are stuck in the past. Most people are quite happy with how digital sounds and even more are more happier with how much easier cheaper faster better it is now with digital.

    I loved tape. I subscribed to tape recording magazine from england in the 60s. I used tape decks and loved them. But they took a lot of work to keep clean and calibrated. Tape media was noisy. First paper tape then plastic then mylar bases but still imperfect.

    I imagine your clients are old curmedgeons who are stuck in the past and too lazy to learn how to use DAWs. Probably still have rotary phones at home on a landline. Maybe a couple of adventerous ones have a flip phone from AARP that is easy to use.

    DAW makers are not going to lose any sleep. You keep telling your clients they are right.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    347
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Mickster View Post
    Each to his own of course........but.......it seems to me that people who disliked computers from the start or never got a lot of exposure or training on them are more likely to avoid a DAW. Conversely...........younger people who might have been "raised" on computers would think that older push button stuff is crazy and limited. I'm not doing a "younger vs older" thing here. Just making a few observations. As for analog.......vs digital........and tape vs digital.......well........in my experience having begun with an old Fostex X-15 (tape).......over the years to a DAW (using 3 different Tascams and a Zoom standalone in between).......the flexibility of the DAW is miles ahead of any standalone with quality to match. Can you point out one or 2 characteristics of a standalone that a DAW can't match........sure......but can you point out MANY characteristics of a DAW that a standalone can't match......absolutely. If you like or need to push buttons.......add a control surface to your DAW and you'll be happy.

    I keep hearing this viewpoint that a DAW is "distracting" and thereby inhibits creativity. For me it's the opposite. As I compose and then create.....I know up front how far I can go with my ideas and can incorporate them in the creation process and the anticipation of all that is VERY motivating.

    If your needs and goals and expressions and compositions are 100% compatible with a standalone......that's great. No one should tell you to go in another direction. But.......are you comfortable telling yourself that a new idea one day.......might not be do-able on your standalone? Sort of like saying to yourself.......well......I'll probably never get any better at creating.

    Before you all bomb me.......these are just my opinions and I've been on both sides of this debate at one time or another. No matter what.......recording is about the love of it and the creation is about the love of that too.
    +1

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 43 Times in 38 Posts
    Rep Power
    420903
    There really shouldn't be much of a debate here. Hard disk recorders are just that: hard disks. It's all digital. The only question is how big do you want your monitor to be.

    As far as the analog v. digital debate, I love the concept of analog. And I love that there are people out there still practicing the art. I use to be a darkroom photographer and I still see people using film and chemicals. It's a very cool process and far more magical than digital. But it's not for me. Neither is vinyl, the rotary phone, typewriters, or drawing with charcoal or pencil. That doesn't me that these approaches are obsolete or uninteresting. It just makes them harder to do. Analog, in any respect, is really a craft. It takes real dedication and it's very hands on. You spend as much time building equipment or trying to find it as you do on the actual process itself. That may be part of the charm, though. Especially if you like old dusty second-hand shops better than Musician's Friend.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to dwillis45 For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    999
    Thanks
    187
    Thanked 118 Times in 111 Posts
    Rep Power
    2383179
    Quote Originally Posted by dwillis45 View Post
    There really shouldn't be much of a debate here. Hard disk recorders are just that: hard disks. It's all digital. The only question is how big do you want your monitor to be.
    Agreed........some people seem to confuse modern stand-alones as analog for some reason. As you point out....they're digital....just like a PC with a DAW. What some debate....however....is that a DAW is somehow worse than a stand alone.........because it's more flexible........can do more........doesn't have buttons and is distracting to the creative process for those reasons and more.

    The analog vs digital debate....especially as regards the characteristics of tape seems to mostly be a pure matter of preference and science. Neither seems debatable to me.
    Just A Song Writer..........

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    372
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 46 Times in 46 Posts
    Rep Power
    114095
    a stand alone recorder will always be easier and more cost effective. i started in the digital recording domain with a zoom 24. while it was easy and fun , it was tedious adding any processing using that scrolling , turning the rotary knob and selecting which track to add effects. still have the recorder , but, it sits idle as i found daw recording so much more versatile.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    I am a recording newbie so I typically don't voice my opinions here because I don't really have much valuable to add in most cases. However, I feel like the OP is in the same boat as me so I will give my thoughts on my own progress.

    I've been trying to get into recording myself and do own a simple Tascam DP-008ex. But right now my concentration is on looking at all the Reaper video. The problem is, the more flexibility there are, the bigger the learning curve. That's what I find with learning to use a DAW properly VS. a simple standalone multi-tracker.

    That's not to say there is no learning curve on the standalones but I do feel there are a lot more variables in working with interfaces and DAWs.

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Toronto/Montreal
    Posts
    531
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    2931359
    I would love to have enough money and space to have a hybrid recording setup. I love the fact that I don't have to deal with tapes and calibrating machines, and also not having to own a ton of outboard gear but I would really enjoy being able to physically mix by turning knobs and moving sliders, like we used to. There is something in the tactile-ness of the act that led me to try things that I don't tend to do anymore, like reamping drum tracks thru guitar effects, and the like.

    Anyway, if given the choice (which I suppose I already have) between going back to sitting in a super hot control room for hours on end fighting to get as much as possible on just a few tracks, or having 100 tracks and all of my old gear in a laptop, i know which option I'd take.

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    HOUSTON, TEXAS
    Posts
    864
    Thanks
    60
    Thanked 144 Times in 128 Posts
    Rep Power
    752370
    Quote Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
    I am a recording newbie so I typically don't voice my opinions here because I don't really have much valuable to add in most cases. However, I feel like the OP is in the same boat as me so I will give my thoughts on my own progress.

    I've been trying to get into recording myself and do own a simple Tascam DP-008ex. But right now my concentration is on looking at all the Reaper video. The problem is, the more flexibility there are, the bigger the learning curve. That's what I find with learning to use a DAW properly VS. a simple standalone multi-tracker.

    That's not to say there is no learning curve on the standalones but I do feel there are a lot more variables in working with interfaces and DAWs.
    Even multi track tape decks had a learning curve. Once you can get some basic concepts under your belt they are all pretty similar-the implementation is usually where the biggest differences lay..
    Win 7 Ult Dell i7 4core 6700ghz 32 GB, 1,2x2, 4 Tb Barracuda HD's running Pro tools 2019 through Allen&Heath Qu-32

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Stand Alone Recorders ?
    By Biggfoot44 in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-19-2019, 05:46
  2. Multitrack Recorders (Stand Alone)
    By gcapel in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-15-2007, 18:54
  3. Multitrack Recorders (Stand Alone)
    By gcapel in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-15-2007, 13:03
  4. ADAT vs. Other Stand Alone Recorders
    By berkleywoods in forum Alesis Forum
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 10-11-2000, 19:12
  5. The Best Stand Alone Recorders?
    By berkleywoods in forum Newbies
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-18-2000, 10:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •