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Thread: Recording a full band on a scarlett-18i8

  1. #1
    4tracker Guest

    Recording a full band on a scarlett-18i8

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    Can you guys give me recommendations on how you'd go about doing this? A family member is having some musical aspirations and wants me to record their band's demo. So this unit has 4xlrs and 4 line inputs on the back. I was thinking 3 xlrs for drums (kick, snare, 1 overhead/ambiance/cymbals), 1 xlr to mic the guitar cab, and then do bass via line-in. Overdub vocals after.

    Is there a better way to do this? I've never been asked to record a full band and do my tracks one at a time...

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    I've never recorded a full band before.... but if I were to do so with your interface, I would:

    Record scratch vocal and guitar to a click.
    Playback scratch tracks and use all 4 inputs to record drums
    Playback newly recorded drums and record guitar and bass.
    Record vox and lead solo stuff last.

  3. #3
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    Why record on a click if we have a live drummer? You're saying to record a click, then have the drummer go back and record live drums over the click? Seems that would be really hard on the drummer to keep such perfect time.

    If this helps, my mics are: 3 small condensers, 1 small omi condenser, 1 dynamic, 2 ribbons.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4tracker View Post
    Why record on a click if we have a live drummer?
    Quote Originally Posted by Chili View Post
    Record scratch vocal and guitar to a click.
    Because you're laying down scratch tracks and you don't want the guitar player setting the tempo.

    And yes, I would have the drummer play to a click. It's not easy, it's not intuitive and it's a skill that has to be learned, but a drummer should be able to play to a click. And I the long run, it's better for the song.

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    i dont know how they do it, good drumming? but my sons band just did it laying down the drums first, then the rest.
    they just started a album/cd to sell at gigs and thats how they did it. drums first then the rest. for the life of me i dont know how that works?
    play drums to the song playing in your head?

    for me it has to be rhythm guitar to a click, because i cant even program a drum machine in time. then its maybe bass and anything goes...and just noises and redoing things until im burnt out.

    if it's not happening in the room, it ain't gonna happen on tape.-H.Gerst

  6. #6
    4tracker Guest
    We want to record the full band (minus vocals) in one take, though, so the click track stuff won't work.

    Would you guys use 1 mic, 2 mics, or 3 mics for drums? I will line-in bass, and use 1 xlr for guitar. The only question is drums really.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4tracker View Post
    I will line-in bass
    You're probably going to regret that, because a bass guitar is instrument level, not line level. It's gonna need a preamp.

    I don't know why you'd stick to doing it fully live. You will definitely get better results doing it as was previously suggested. Especially considering you were going to do a mono overhead mic... If the drums are mono, and the bass is mono, and the vocals are being recorded mono, the only potential option you'll have for stereo is double tracking guitar and vocals.

    But if you want to do it live, the best way I can see it being done your way is with the kick/snare/mono OH (or kick and stereo overheads), micing the guitar cab, and then either overdubbing the bass and vocals later, or you'll have to buy an outboard preamp for the bass guitar and then run that into the line input on the Focusrite.

    Good luck to ya, mate.

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    You can just run everything through a mixer and just shove the resultant stereo mix into the computer.
    But you'll have to play every section perfectly cause there will be no separating instruments.
    There were plenty of bands up through the 60s that recorded that way....

  9. #9
    4tracker Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by MrWrenchey View Post
    You're probably going to regret that, because a bass guitar is instrument level, not line level. It's gonna need a preamp.

    I don't know why you'd stick to doing it fully live. You will definitely get better results doing it as was previously suggested. Especially considering you were going to do a mono overhead mic... If the drums are mono, and the bass is mono, and the vocals are being recorded mono, the only potential option you'll have for stereo is double tracking guitar and vocals.

    But if you want to do it live, the best way I can see it being done your way is with the kick/snare/mono OH (or kick and stereo overheads), micing the guitar cab, and then either overdubbing the bass and vocals later, or you'll have to buy an outboard preamp for the bass guitar and then run that into the line input on the Focusrite.

    Good luck to ya, mate.
    Sorry, I meant DI not line-in.

    So maybe 3 mics on drums, DI the bass, and mic the guitar. Then overdub guitar later for stereo. And we can do vocals later and maybe put some reverb on them for depth. I realize isolating the instruments will be difficult.

    To answer why: because we have 1 or 2 days to do this, and it's just a demo for a family member. I don't want to dedicate time to click tracks and having some high school kid try to drum to that, which he probably is unfamiliar with and won't be able to do. These are 15 year old kids who are just trying to put together a demo to get some gigs.

  10. #10
    4tracker Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by TimOBrien View Post
    You can just run everything through a mixer and just shove the resultant stereo mix into the computer.
    But you'll have to play every section perfectly cause there will be no separating instruments.
    There were plenty of bands up through the 60s that recorded that way....
    Yeah I like this idea.
    Anyone have suggestions onthe best way to separate drums from the guitar in a garage environment? I was going to put some blankets and padding on the walls, maybe face the guitar amp in the opposite direction from the drums and put it in a box or blanket and use cardiod or figure 8 mics to control what's hitting the mics. I think that's about all I can do given what I have to work with.

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