Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Recording Acoustic Guitar and Vocals at the Same Time

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas USA
    Posts
    1,953
    Thanks
    154
    Thanked 365 Times in 333 Posts
    Rep Power
    2178943
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Any “excellent” recording starts within the performance. Then the room and mic positioning will determine how it sounds after mixing. Except for using figure 8 mics positioned to reduce bleed most of us just have to experiment and figure out what works

    Bleed isn’t necessarily a problem though it can limit some of the things you could do in mixing.

    For electric guitar simply isolating the amp in a closet might be a reasonable solution if you don’t want to go direct.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Thanks guys for all the comments and tips! I don't have the budget right now to treat the room so I will just have to experiment, live with the bit of bleed.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    essex
    Posts
    2,531
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 343 Times in 312 Posts
    Rep Power
    3901875
    it won't be a bit, it's be a lot. Enough to make editing extremely tiresome. If you need to edit, then record the guitar first, then overdub the voice.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    57
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Rep Power
    11
    If you "eat" the vocal mic, you can minimize bleed. If your voice is too loud to get up close to your LDC, then try a dynamic mic instead.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    I would use a dynamic mic for the vocals and the large diaphragm condenser on the guitar. You can put a mic in front of the Loudbox if you want but it ain’t gonna sound that good. I've tried putting a mic in front of an acoustic amp before and it don’t sound right at all. You’d be better off taking the line out from the amp and recording it direct than you would be with a mic in front of it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    North of the Humber and South of the Tweed
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    0
    I use a single condenser mic to record my singing self accompanied on ukulele. It's a matter of adjusting the positioning of the mic to give a decent balance between voice and instrument. I find if I place the mic opposite my face, both can be clearly heard but the vocals aren't drowned by the instrument. I find with fingerpicking, the instrument can be a bit quiet. In that case I also record the instrument by plugging a pickup directly into the recorder. You can then use the instrument track to achieve a better balance between voice and instrument.

    If you prefer to use two mics or mic plus pickup, then I agree with what's been said earlier. Dynamic mic for vocals (less sensitive) and condenser mic for guitar or plug pickup directly into the recorder. If you're doing the latter, you might want to think about putting the output from the guitar through a preamp although most interfaces seem very well able to cope with the output from a piezo pickup.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-29-2014, 06:34
  2. Recording acoustic and vocals at the same time.
    By ManInMotion711 in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-13-2013, 07:06
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-28-2011, 15:03
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-08-2011, 05:23
  5. Replies: 18
    Last Post: 02-15-2010, 18:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •