Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 52

Thread: Another bloody preamp thread

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Age
    33
    Posts
    19,289
    Thanks
    1,178
    Thanked 989 Times in 872 Posts
    Rep Power
    1000000
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Quote Originally Posted by _brian_ View Post
    I have Yamaha actives and I use beyerdynamic headphones as well as listening in the car/consumer systems to get a feel for what others will hear.

    I know you’d all find this boring but I’d rather set up the microphone to an amp once. Ready for recording every time - the best place it can be and then I never have to worry about it. I feel it should be the arrangement that excites not the production - but this is probably where I’m going wrong.
    Oh, I'm not sure I'd 100% commit to that idea!
    I'd rather be a great writer/performer/arranger and competent at recording than the other way around.


    To be honest, the *problem* with home recording is that we have so many tools and options to focus on that quite often we forget what's important.
    Writing/Arrangement/Performance.

    Everything after that should be an attempt to preserve or enhance. With acoustically recorded music, those are the three main things, for me.
    If that's where your passion lies, don't knock it!

    That said, Having some basic understanding of gear choice and microphone placement is important.
    You don't necessarily need to do 100 comparison takes and work the mic to the mm, but you should know there's a huge difference between pointing at an acoustic sound hole and pointing at 12th fret, for example.


    As far as gear...You're not into the minutia. That's cool.
    You should have no trouble finding 'fun' threads on here or on gearslutz about 'desert island vocal chains' and that sort of thing.
    I have no idea if your current interface/preamps are quality or not. Hopefully someone can comment there,
    but there are plenty of reasonably priced combinations that you just can't go wrong with.

    Like, if someone gave me an RME interface with a handful of onboard preamps, an sm7b, and a pair of c414s, for example, and said that's it...That's all you get...
    I'd be happy enough.

    Ok, it's different if you're recording a full kit, band, or ensemble, but for any vocal or solo acoustic performance, I struggle to see myself complaining about that ^^.
    ---------- Steenaudio Website ----------

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas USA
    Posts
    1,997
    Thanks
    165
    Thanked 371 Times in 338 Posts
    Rep Power
    2178943
    Quote Originally Posted by _brian_ View Post
    I have Yamaha actives and I use beyerdynamic headphones as well as listening in the car/consumer systems to get a feel for what others will hear.

    I know you’d all find this boring but I’d rather set up the microphone to an amp once. Ready for recording every time - the best place it can be and then I never have to worry about it. I feel it should be the arrangement that excites not the production - but this is probably where I’m going wrong.
    I don't read anything wrong in that - in fact having a setup where you can just sit down and quickly record is ideal if it's typically just you. It allows you to compare your performance without wondering if it was the mic change or whatever that is the difference, and also lets you make small changes between takes to fine-tune the setup. It also allows you to come back and make another take for a comp or punch in something that really has to be fixed and not have a massive time sink, or perhaps mean you simply have to re-track everything because getting the same sound is impossible.

    Your "monitoring system" is about like a lot of what we have at our disposal. (And exactly what I have, though I augment with a couple more sets of headphones/earbuds, and sometimes even the TV "soundbar".)

    I'd say do that short bit of some cover song in a style similar to what you are going for, and get some feedback on your mixing chops to settle down (and start it on a thread in mixing techniques or even MP3 subforum).

    The idea that anyone can say "buy A+B+C" and you'll be good to go is, I'm tempted to say, delusional, but that's wrong. There are a lot of pieces (i.e., not just one, ideal) you can put together and record well enough on. It's all the other stuff that's been mentioned here that really matter, and until you're sure of yourself, objective feedback from others is the only way to get there IMO. You'll keep spinning your wheels otherwise.
    "... I know in the mornin' that it's gonna be good
    when I stick out my elbows and they don't bump wood." - Bill Kirchen

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    HOUSTON, TEXAS
    Posts
    813
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 136 Times in 121 Posts
    Rep Power
    752369
    Put together a "test" session. Import a commercial track by an artist you are trying to get the sound similar to. Set up and take pics of the setup then record as specific piece of music/vocal/ and label both test 1. Move microphone/change setup call it test 2 take another pic and play/sing the exact same thing. Then you can listen back and "score" the different takes. Then using your pictures, set up that way and forget about it. It may seem like a waste of time since you are not actually making music but in the long run it will be time well spent as you will have less to do prior to hitting the record button. Keep your test session and pics and you will have a database of different sonics available to you-something some paid engineers do is keep notes like that. All pro engineers fully document recording sessions(well the assistants do the real work usually) but I learned from experience, if you have to re-record something and it's a month later you might not remember how you got a particular sound. I have an A&H Qu32 and the preamps in yours are supposed to be better than mine. I record directly through them for most everything, though I have a home built pre that I sometimes use for vocals
    Win 7 Ult Dell i7 4core 6700ghz 32 GB, 1,2x2, 4 Tb Barracuda HD's running Pro tools 2018 through Allen&Heath Qu-32

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    526
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    93396
    Some excellent advice in this thread, should have come here sooner rather than confusing myself and tearing my hair out wondering why the hell im not getting where I want to be.

    Iíve never documented settings, which is silly because Iíve only a few times felt - that guitar sounds great etc and it disappears into a mix down and becomes a mystery as to how I did it.

    Iíve never believed in music theory, I think music should naturally come to you. But maybe Iíve wrongly tried this same approach with more technical subjects like this and although it may become natural later on I guess itís after a lot of experience.

    I guess I am still at the beginner stage in all this and have to go back to basics and follow the rules.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    essex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 357 Times in 325 Posts
    Rep Power
    3902800
    I'd bet you already know a hell of a lot of music theory, but just don't realise that's why you compose music that sounds nice. The rules are not rigid things to follow blindly, they just allow you to predict what will work, what might not and they explain how music sort of holds together. They appear difficult and restrictive - but they just use strange vocabulary, are pretty historic in nature and difficult to relate to - until you realise that they often put things in place that help. Some people write their music in the key of C Major if they play a synth or keyboard - so plenty of C, F and G chords. The music theorists talk about chords I-IV-V instead because that's what C, F and G are, and the guitar composers might have A,D and E as their three chords - which are also I-IV-V. Numbers instead of letters. Look up fascinating stuff like the circle of fifths. If you start at C on the keyboard and go up 5 steps to F, you now are in F Major, with one Flat (the Bb). Go up another 5 steps to the Bb - this key has two flats, Bb and Eb - keep going and you go through all the flat keys, then suddenly move toi the sharp keys, which reduce graduall down till yiu get back to C. No sudden wow factor, but the theory lets yopu work out how many flats and sharps different keys have, and how the notes all relate. If you spend any time with bass players they tend to bang on about modes - and they get a bit pompous about all the Greek-style names they can play. I've played bass for 40 years, and can never remember the names of the modes bar a couple. I just hear the right notes in my head. I tend to just play these and not bother about what scale they come from - they just come. It's a bit like finding saomebody who can explain the offside rule in UK football. Everyone shouts offisde all the time, and just know it was - few know the wording of the rule.

    Keep on making music. Shove the faders, tweak the knobs, get good at twiddling. I never follow anybody else's prescription for mixing and recording. There is no need to conform unless you have to produce music to exact specifications where level and stereo content and dynamic may be closely prescribed.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas USA
    Posts
    1,997
    Thanks
    165
    Thanked 371 Times in 338 Posts
    Rep Power
    2178943
    Quote Originally Posted by rob aylestone View Post
    .... I've played bass for 40 years, and can never remember the names of the modes bar a couple. ....
    momentary diversion:
    I don't play lounge music any longer.

    Ionian
    Dorian
    Phrygian
    Lydian
    Mixolydian
    Aeolian
    Locrian

    I never did play lounge music, but I warm up with my modes every time I pick up the guitar .
    "... I know in the mornin' that it's gonna be good
    when I stick out my elbows and they don't bump wood." - Bill Kirchen

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Age
    18
    Posts
    44
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    I have an AT2035. Great mic considering the low cost. I have run it through my Warm Audio TB12 and gotten pretty good results - particularly with acoustic guitar and vocals. The TB12 also works *great* as a bass DI. The TB12 is marketed as a "color" adding preamp - but it's tweakable and can be set for a more transparent sound. Please keep in mind that I am quite inexperienced.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    526
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    93396
    Quote Originally Posted by PorterhouseMusic View Post
    I have an AT2035. Great mic considering the low cost. I have run it through my Warm Audio TB12 and gotten pretty good results - particularly with acoustic guitar and vocals. The TB12 also works *great* as a bass DI. The TB12 is marketed as a "color" adding preamp - but it's tweakable and can be set for a more transparent sound. Please keep in mind that I am quite inexperienced.
    Earlier I was thinking about getting an RE-20 mic along with the TB12. Was also thinking about the DAV BG1, but there is limited info about it online.
    The Adding Machine

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    essex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 357 Times in 325 Posts
    Rep Power
    3902800
    Ive bought quite a few mics because I thought I wanted one. The EV is a strange one, and for a few months I brought it out of mothballs and gave it a real shot. I left it in the studio on a stand, and knowing I'm lazy, I figured I'd then use it for all sorts, simply because to get up, and hunt for the most appropriate one from my mental list would be outweighed by my laziness. It was.

    It worked for every vocal or voice over I put it on - but without any sort of 'character'. A bit like a 57. You know you have better, but the 57 is a known and predictable mic you can depend on to not let you down. There is a plus side to the EV. When you stick it in front of a less disciplined or experienced performer, the little changes in their mouth to mic distance don't matter. The sound stays the same - you just get a bit more room 'air'. It worked for a series of complex BVs, where from day to day, they had to sound exactly the same. Did this really well. Trouble is, eventually I needed something different and put the EV away, and it's been away since then again. It just doesn't seem to add much of it's own, like 57s - and maybe this is the key. The posh mics, the posh preamps all do a bit more than just work transparently, and that is the little bit extra you like and want to repeat?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    526
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    93396
    Quote Originally Posted by rob aylestone View Post
    Ive bought quite a few mics because I thought I wanted one. The EV is a strange one, and for a few months I brought it out of mothballs and gave it a real shot. I left it in the studio on a stand, and knowing I'm lazy, I figured I'd then use it for all sorts, simply because to get up, and hunt for the most appropriate one from my mental list would be outweighed by my laziness. It was.

    It worked for every vocal or voice over I put it on - but without any sort of 'character'. A bit like a 57. You know you have better, but the 57 is a known and predictable mic you can depend on to not let you down. There is a plus side to the EV. When you stick it in front of a less disciplined or experienced performer, the little changes in their mouth to mic distance don't matter. The sound stays the same - you just get a bit more room 'air'. It worked for a series of complex BVs, where from day to day, they had to sound exactly the same. Did this really well. Trouble is, eventually I needed something different and put the EV away, and it's been away since then again. It just doesn't seem to add much of it's own, like 57s - and maybe this is the key. The posh mics, the posh preamps all do a bit more than just work transparently, and that is the little bit extra you like and want to repeat?
    Thatís why I thought using the TB12 with the RE20 would be a good idea. The TB12 looks like itís able to do clean and coloured well and has a lot of tonal options on there like changing transformers, caps etc.

    But in the end Iím guessing, sadly I know no one that can hear my voice - which Iím not overly keen on and give me advice as to what mic etc would compliment it.

    Oh to have enough money to buy a load of shit, trial it all and sell whatever doesnít work - or keep it!

    There you go, canít even think like a posh person in that scenario, Iím still wanting to dump things on eBay!!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Just bloody ask!
    By ecc83 in forum User Contributions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-20-2018, 08:33
  2. Bloody Mary.....
    By Dogman in forum MP3 Mixing Clinic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-22-2008, 05:40
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-29-2008, 06:23
  4. Harvey's Great Preamp Thread!!!
    By turnitdown in forum Microphones
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-25-2004, 23:10
  5. Preamp thread... heads up.
    By DJL in forum The Rack
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 08-23-2003, 11:21

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •