Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Where does the line go on plagiarism?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Where does the line go on plagiarism?

    Sign in to disable this ad
    I'm making a death metal album, and I'm a little confused when it comes to plagiarism in music. You see, half the time I'm making riffs, I have no idea if the riff is a product of my creativity or a product of my memory.

    In your opinion, where does the line go between A: composing something vaguely similar as a tribute to a band you like and B: composing something that everyone agrees is an infringement?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    347
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Samgai View Post
    I'm making a death metal album, and I'm a little confused when it comes to plagiarism in music. You see, half the time I'm making riffs, I have no idea if the riff is a product of my creativity or a product of my memory.

    In your opinion, where does the line go between A: composing something vaguely similar as a tribute to a band you like and B: composing something that everyone agrees is an infringement?

    it goes through the court when somebody sues you

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    I think that as long as you maintain an awareness surrounding the authenticity of your music you should be fine. Ask your fellow musicians and if you are not sure verify it for yourself. It is better to be sure then sorry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    South Florida
    Age
    50
    Posts
    90
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Rep Power
    208474
    In your opinion, where does the line go between A: composing something vaguely similar as a tribute to a band you like and B: composing something that everyone agrees is an infringement?
    That line is always moving and it depends on the original artist/band who owns the copyright and the courts/laws for that region you live in.

    Always verify if you are making something as a tribute to a certain song from a certain band, with who ever owns that copyright.

    You cannot play the same guitar riff and have the same melody. Most stuff is common sense. If you feel like you are doing something wrong, you most likely are.
    If you have no idea if you wrote something form feel or memory, its your responsibility to research it until you are 100% satisfied you are not plagiarizing. This comes with the music writing territory.
    Online Audio Mastering - Online Mastering & Mixing Studio
    Audio Production Blog - Tips & Techniques Explained In Simple Terms

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    That is great information, thank you. When I hear music I love, my first intuition is "yes, more of this!". So my riffs are definitely not the same riff or melody as anyone else's, but some of them have a strikingly similar vibe/groove. Can you get in trouble even for that?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    essex
    Posts
    2,625
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 365 Times in 332 Posts
    Rep Power
    3902800
    I guess a good test is to play the music to 12 people with no particular musical talent and if they think it's the same, then in court, it is. There have been so many close calls and it's always a risk. George Michael's White Christmas and Barry Mannilow's Can't live without you. You can hum the tune of one to the other. The melody is different, but the chord pattern is the same for quite a bit off the song. However I/VI/IV/V has been used in so many songs over the years, that pattern has kind of been lost to plagiarism, but when you add rhythm and the melody, the trap closes. So much now depends on how lucky you are, and how you would cope with legal costs. For most people - nothing ever happens, but it could.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to rob aylestone For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    This makes sense. I found this reply very helpful. I think I'll just recompose some of the most similar parts. Seems to be the best route.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0

    Nexus from a friend

    Does somebody know if it is possible to buy nexus expansions on your own name. And download them on a nexus starter pack who is bought by someone else, so who is on someone else's name?

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Samgai View Post
    That is great information, thank you. When I hear music I love, my first intuition is "yes, more of this!". So my riffs are definitely not the same riff or melody as anyone else's, but some of them have a strikingly similar vibe/groove. Can you get in trouble even for that?
    Most of the replies here are more or less correct but:

    You are only ever going to get into 'trouble' if someone takes you to court, and that will only happen if you make a shedload of money from your recording. Even then, you don't have to go to court, you can add the person's name as a songwriter and split the proceeds - after all, that is the outcome they are looking for should it get as far as the court.

    Second, you can spend ten years researching other tracks to see if yours is original, and only just scratch the surface. The fact is, it's all been done before. That chord sequence you wrote? It's been done thousands of times already. That vocal melody? You may well have genuinely thought it up yourself, but somebody somewhere will already have done it. Lyrics are a bit easier to be original with, there are far more word permutations than there are musical ones.

    That riff? Well again, someone, somewhere will already have done it, that's pretty much guaranteed.

    So I wouldn't worry too much. If the song you wrote sounds exactly like a song that you know, then of course, you may want to rethink it. But I wouldn't worry too much about the opinions of others, it's all subjective. Just go ahead and record. If you get sued because you made millions, it's a nice problem to have.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to aj113 For This Useful Post:


  12. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    This was very helpful, thank you aj113. I feel like this was one of the most level-headed practical posts I've ever read on this topic.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Mastering website plagiarism
    By ausrock in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 09-12-2008, 00:20
  2. How do you avoid plagiarism?
    By GringoKC in forum Vocal Technique & Processing
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-09-2002, 19:47

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •