View Poll Results: how much have you spent so far?

Voters
21. You may not vote on this poll
  • under 300

    0 0%
  • 300 - 499

    0 0%
  • 500 - 999

    1 4.76%
  • 1000 - 2999

    2 9.52%
  • 3000 - 4999

    1 4.76%
  • 5000 - 9999

    1 4.76%
  • 10,000 and up

    10 47.62%
  • just a fun hobby

    2 9.52%
  • serious hobby would like to make $$

    2 9.52%
  • trying to be a pro and make it big

    0 0%
  • already made my expenses and more

    2 9.52%
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Thread: how much have you spent/made with your recording gear

  1. #21
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    Like in any profession, buy the best tools you can afford.
    Not to say the job can't be done with lesser tools.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    Well...I don't think that's really the point of what we do with music and audio.
    If we all just focused on what the average listener hears or likes to hear...we should just stop all this recording stuff right now.

    That's like saying why are people wasting their money on a BMW when a $15k compact gets them from point A to B the same as the BMW...etc.
    We can go on and on with many other examples of higher quality/price VS lower, and where a lot of people would opt for the higher quality/price if they could, because it's worthwhile to them...so I don't know why that doesn't apply to audio, and I fail to see the relevance of "no one notices that I used a $59 mic".

    IMO, we can't compare what we do and why... with that which the general public hears, sees and understands.
    I don't know where other people work from...but I don't look at this as simply trying to reduce everything down to the lowest/cheapest common denominator.

    It's like once a month this similar discussion gets churned up in the home rec world...some sort of indirect (or even direct) denial of anything that costs more than a few hundred bucks, as being hyped and unnecessary, or something like that...and it's always coming from the point of low/no budget perspectives, which is a self-serving argument.
    Everyone would buy a Neve console...IF...they won the lottery...but because they can only afford a $59 USB mic...then the need for expensive, high-end gear is all just a myth for the most part.


    I do not have a lot of money to throw around. I have to do the best I can with my budget. As long as it meets my standards then I am happy to spend less money than trying to 'improve' it by spending more. The dirty little truth is that after not much money all you get is different not better by spending more.

    Fortunately I do not care when people put down my stuff as being too cheap. I get results with it. I am happy. They need to fix their own problems not try to feel superior because they spend more money.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwillis45 View Post
    It's also very Darwinian. Most old people and those with poor vision can't see your posts. And that eliminates us from the discussion.




    actually those with poor vision and who are old can see them better which is why i use it

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr average View Post

    I do not have a lot of money to throw around. I have to do the best I can with my budget. As long as it meets my standards then I am happy to spend less money than trying to 'improve' it by spending more. The dirty little truth is that after not much money all you get is different not better by spending more.

    Fortunately I do not care when people put down my stuff as being too cheap. I get results with it. I am happy. They need to fix their own problems not try to feel superior because they spend more money.
    Hey...we've all been "poor" at one point or another, but that doesn't mean we have to feel guilty when there is money to spend, just because someone else doesn't have it.

    You can debate what "little" difference there is between cheap stuff and the higher-end gear...I don't much care about those discussions, because like I said, most of the people the "debunk" high-end gear are the ones who can't afford it...so there's some built-in bias in those arguments.
    If the day comes when pros with experience and credibility en mass start rejecting higher-end gear as just mythical hype...I'll take note, but until then, and apart from the odd person here and there...I don't see that happening where the rubber meets the road...only on home rec sites.

    Not sure who is putting you down for being too cheap...???...and you seem rather chip-on-shoulder about it, so much so that you need to do these polls to see where you and others stand, but underneath it all, you seem to be looking for an opportunity to put down anyone that has money and buys higher-end gear.
    So maybe it's you feeling the other way around...and not that anyone is acting superior because they spend more money than you.

    That said...I myself will never feel guilty about having and spending money on audio gear when others don't have it and if/when I do...that's what money is for.

    Oh...and why on earth is this poll/thread in the Newbies forum...? They are the last ones who would have a realistic opinion about anything audio, because they are "newbies".

  6. #25
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    I can't see myself knocking anyone for spending a bundle on the good stuff. I've made my opinions known on occasion where arguably "poor judgement" was involved (spending $2500 on a mic and listening on $500 "monitors" is usually that type of thing) and I'm not one for "snake oil" (my monitoring chain easily tops $10k - but my speaker cables don't).

    Beyond that, there are several layers of what and why to spend on what.

    One layer -- I still do a fair amount of live tracking and what not. Depending on what the expectations are, I may use "in house" gear - or I may bring my own. Do the recordings through my stuff sound better than the "house" stuff typically? You bet your a$$ they do. Is it a $15k difference that everyone is going to rave over? Probably not. If the goal is an archival recording to use for YouTube videos and sponsors, the house gear is fine. If they're going to make a live album for public release, maybe I'll bring a better set of converters or some nicer preamps. Just like purchasing the gear, it's a calculation that needs to be made.

    Then there are internal / external expectations -- Are these *your* expectations or a *client's* expectations? If you're recording your stuff and you're happy with it, it doesn't matter a darn what you use as long as you get what you want out of it. But when you have clients that have higher expectations - or simply the expectations of the "higher-end" gear, you have to satisfy those expectations. I'm presenting more than a weird skill - The goal is to present a system that's arguably better and more detailed than possibly any system they'll ever hear their recording on. They want nameplates that make them comfortable. They expect gear they aren't going to find at the local Banjo Shack. It's a package. And although I do know a few people who buy a bunch of expensive gear that don't exactly have the skills to back it up, the vast majority of the time, it's someone's expansion of talent and skill that leads to upgrade gear. And again - far be it from me to knock the folks who want to get the good stuff that might not *YET* know what they're doing with it. Dad always told me (actually he was speaking of tools, so this applies) - "Get the best you can afford and if you can afford it, get the best. That way, you can't bitch about it later." Having the best hammer doesn't make you the best carpenter - But the best carpenter probably has a pretty sweet hammer.

    Then there's the whole "knowing" thing (call it skills, call it talent, whether studied or innate). There are people I know that have been at this for years, that do it for hobby, that can't hear the difference between [this and that]. Maybe they don't have the listening skills (there are some people who don't understand that critical listening is a skill - and a perishable one at that), maybe they have crappy monitors (many speakers I know that say "Studio Monitor" on them would fall into this category for that matter), maybe a combination. You need to know the limitations of your skills and hope that your gear exceeds those limitations.

    All of that out of the way -- This is an awfully good time to be involved in this stuff. There is some seriously decent *and* freakishly cheap gear out there. There are $400 mics that compete with $4000 mics. There are $300 preamps that compete with $3000 preamps. IF you have the listening skills - and a monitoring chain that is accurate and consistent enough to utilize those skills - in a space that's accurate and consistent enough to utilize that monitoring chain - you can do a whole lot with nearly nothing. Or you can spend a bunch of money on kick-ass hand-made boutique gear and do even a little more.

    In any case, buying cheap isn't always a horrible thing. Not knowing your limitations is much worse.

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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Massive Master View Post

    All of that out of the way -- This is an awfully good time to be involved in this stuff. There is some seriously decent *and* freakishly cheap gear out there. There are $400 mics that compete with $4000 mics. There are $300 preamps that compete with $3000 preamps. IF you have the listening skills - and a monitoring chain that is accurate and consistent enough to utilize those skills - in a space that's accurate and consistent enough to utilize that monitoring chain - you can do a whole lot with nearly nothing. Or you can spend a bunch of money on kick-ass hand-made boutique gear and do even a little more.
    Right...the argument isn't against buying/using inexpensive gear...there's some good stuff out there...and a deal is a deal.
    I love when I get something really good for really cheap.

    I just find the very often the arguments against buying/using higher-end gear are mostly made by folks who simply can't afford to go that route, so they feel better if they can dismiss any need or value in it.

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    Right...the argument isn't against buying/using inexpensive gear...there's some good stuff out there...and a deal is a deal.
    I love when I get something really good for really cheap.

    I just find the very often the arguments against buying/using higher-end gear are mostly made by folks who simply can't afford to go that route, so they feel better if they can dismiss any need or value in it.

    We dismiss the need for really expensive gear because it adds no special value over moderately priced gear when it comes to sound quality.
    You may or may not get some features making it easier to use, or you may or may not get more reliability, but mostly you get some fancy name
    plate that you can show off and brag about that adds no value sonically.

  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr average View Post
    We dismiss the need for really expensive gear because it adds no special value over moderately priced gear when it comes to sound quality.
    You may or may not get some features making it easier to use, or you may or may not get more reliability, but mostly you get some fancy name
    plate that you can show off and brag about that adds no value sonically.
    Right...OK.
    It's all about paying thousands for fancy name plates.

    It's that kind of blanket bias that smacks more of trolling for effect...than having any merit based in reality.
    It basically implies that all studio pros are liars, and they have all intentionally agreed to mislead recording newbs to get them to buy expensive name plates.


    The funniest thing is that most of the people who can't afford the high-end gear, and who dismiss it...have never actually used it with any regularity (since they can't afford it)...yet they are so absolutely full of opinions about it!

  11. #29
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    Massive had it when he mentioned "monitors". So, so often we see the noob is just concerned with the "front end". Microphone, AI and often with bolting on a pre amp to "improve" that. They do not see and will not believe it when told that their recordings can only be as good as the quality and accuracy of the monitoring system. Why? Possibly because anything aproaching accurate monitor speakers start at $500 a pair. Yes, good headphones can do most of it but not all. Room treatment is seen as pointless, they would rather spend $400 on another mic or "tooob" pre amp than rocfkwool.

    My view is that modestly priced kit can be excellent but there are limits, anyone who thinks a $59 mic is the equal of a $590 one is in cloud cuckoo land (but, but the $59 mic MIGHT work for something, sometime)

    As I built the recording system for my son I was careful to buy the best I could afford, which was not a lot. I read endless reviews until I fixed on my Tannoy 5As. They don't go loud nor low but I think they are as accurate a monitor as I can get for the money. I intend to upgrade to better, like the Result 6, if and when financies allow. The car will surely have to go in a couple of years so that will free up a couple of k a year.

    My first interface was the Behringer BCA200. An unrealiable crock of it with crap drivers but when it did work it produced very good results. The mic pres were a revelation in terms of low noise. I had built mic amps over the years, mainly with valves and transformers and transistors and transformers but the Berry ones beat 'em. Some years later I built a transformerless pre based on the "THAT" IC, that was very good (and the bits cost about a tenner!).

    Next up when the BC2K broke for the final time, was an M-A Fast track pro. Good interface with very low latency (son had gotten into MIDI and Cubase) but the mic pres were too noisy for dynamics on AC guitar. Saved up and bought Sontronics LDC and later a pair of AKG P150s.

    My view is that you CAN make excellent recordings without spending a fortune but you have to be prepared to spend SOME money and be smart about it. One thing for sure, a $150 interface will give you way better technical quality than tape!

    Dave.

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  13. #30
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    When you cannot afford the best you buy cheaper brands and convince yourself it is as good or better and you found a magical product nobody else considers or knows about. When you can afford the magic brand product you buy it and inevitably the thing just works and is less exciting than you thought, something of an anticlimax.

    On the gear front, I've been trying to remember my purchases over the years, and even my mixer buys go into the top spend box. Some I'd even forgotten about.
    Soundtracks topaz
    Soundcraft ghost
    Yamaha gl32
    Soundcraft lx7
    Peavey 32ch
    Behringer X32
    Midas M32

    And I just found in the store my 1970s Shure mixer that I bought as a teenager.

    Funny how some lasted a very long time and others were much shorter lived. The Yamaha and the ghost were the longest running and the ghost was scraped last month and the Yamaha will be gong in the summer. I think the Shure is approaching antique status so I'll hang on to it. When I was 17, some of my buys were saved for and used parents funds, but at twenty my buys then would have been on borrowed money. I didn't start serious sound kit buying till the 90s.

    I've also done exactly the same thing with video kit with video cameras. I still have the sony 300 betacam I used when doing video work. It cost me a HUGE amount of money, paid for itself quite quickly, and I just can't scrap it as it's worth nothing, but still works. I also cannot bear the weight on my shoulder. Modern video folk have no idea how nice and light their kit is now.

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