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Thread: Pitch test

  1. #1
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    Pitch test

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    So I had another vocal lesson today and my teacher told me to sing semi-acapella to my friends so that they can tell me every time my pitch is off.

    I'm a little shy to sing around my friends, so I thought I'd share it with you guys.

    -Sound ok?
    -Pitch problems that you hear?
    -Thanks, much apprectiated

    http://www.esnips.com/doc/bd6b2163-9...pitch-test.mp3
    For only in their dreams can men be truly free. Twas always thus, twas always thus will be. --Keating

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    "learn some" doesn't quite up there....

    "fate" and "I'm yours" seemed a bit off too....the good news is...

    you have a fabulous voice. Either that or your a whiz at computer vocal correction.

    I've been singing seriously for nearly 15-16 years now, and been singing in general ever since I was a little kid....bottom line, I know a thing or two about quality and I like your tone a lot. Pitch is very good overall also. If your vocal teacher said otherwise then fire him/her. Right now.

    The funny thing about the style of music that you sang in that piece (did you write that by the way?) is that a large amount of the pitches are fungible. The softer notes are usually given more of a vocalization rather than an actual distinct pitch....and theres a lot of inexact sliding associated with that style too (trailing off, sliding up, etc). You nailed all the aspects of what that song should probably sound like. That is CD ready.

    The last thing (because of post length) is that you did really well hitting every pitch in a lot ofc those 3-4 note runs that you have in there. Don't let anyone tell you thats easy because its not. You hear radio stars everyday who can't do that. It takes skill to give them good separation so that you can hear each note while still singing them on pitch.

    Congratulations..............you can call yourself a good singer.

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    Wow, I must have posted this at just the right time! Thanks for the quality and thoughtful response, and even better that you're experienced in vocals! I'm still fairly new at it (Singing for around 5 years, lessons for about 6-8 months).

    (1) I wish I was a whiz at computer correcting vocals 'cause maybe the rest of my tracks would sound better!

    (2) I also wish that I wrote that...haha. That's a piece by Jason Mraz called 'I'm Yours'. I tried to choose a song with alot of separation in the notes.

    (3) Do you have any suggestions for hitting those notes that I'm just not quite getting?? I swear I can hear them perfectly in tune in my head, but when I listen to the recording it's a little off.

    (4) Thanks for all the compliments, very inspiring coming from a credible source such as yourself! I've never really performed in front of more than 2 or 3 people so I need all the inspiration I can get...

    Thanks again!
    For only in their dreams can men be truly free. Twas always thus, twas always thus will be. --Keating

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    I had a feeling that the performance aspect was what your teacher was getting at more than anything else.

    As far as the "bad" notes go, they weren't too terribly bad. quarter to half step off....usually flat. Thats common. The only way to get to them is to give it more air...or if you wanna use bad technique push a little harder. the air method will require you to work out your breathing a bit more.

    My advice for a beginner is to practice your breathing and get your lungs good and strong. You could tell a little bit that most of your slipping notes were in the last third to quarter of the song. You probably got tired...is that right?
    Good breathing exercises are as follows.

    To make sure you're breathing properly......
    Lie on your back with a book on your stomach (not chest) just take deep breaths and feel the book rise and fall as your rib cage stays still. ALL the expansion should be in your beer belly.

    To increase your breathing stamina......
    1) Take a deep breath and make a loud hissing sound. count how many beats you can do this for. Generally about 60bps is a good level. Anyone can exhale for 30 beats at a fast enough tempo.

    Next take a deep breath and make a soft hissing sound. Same procedure.

    2) Take a regular breath and hold a note. Count how many beats you can hold it until the pitch starts breaking. This will either be because you moved off the pitch, or you're running out of air.

    3) Take a normal breath and sing the Do-Me-So-Me-Do pitches (in C Major this would be C-E-G-E-C) and a breathy and staccato fashion. Sing the syllable of "ha" on each note (helps produce the breathy tone). This exercise seems pointless but this axercise is actually the best for someone doing pop/rock vocals. The first two are great for people singing really flowing/legato songs. But pop/rock vocals feature lots of energetic vocal bursts which require a strong diaphragm. This exercise will help you accomplish that.

    When doing these exercises thing of it like doing bicep curls or a bench press. Use good form and technique with each "rep". Once you've got the fundamentals down, then you can begin experimenting (singing on the move....singing while you're hunched over - foot on the monitor style....etc)

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    one more thing..........

    You always sound bad to yourself. I have recorded stuff and thought "man that sucks" and everyone else around said "really? I didn't hear anything wrong with it.

    be objective, but don't be over-sensitive. Or at least try. thats a very hard line to walk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCreel
    ...most of your slipping notes were in the last third to quarter of the song. You probably got tired...is that right?
    Yeah, I'm always getting tired after about a minute of singing! It's getting a little better though...

    And I've been introduced to a few of those exercises, but I haven't really been doing them with any regularity, maybe that's my problem right there! I usually do vocal exercises about 4-5 times a week in the car (scales, diatonic thirds, bubbling, etc). No real breathing exercises though, so I'll practice those!

    On a side note: Thanks for all the instruction you're giving me... I feel like I should be paying you! I really appreciate this!
    For only in their dreams can men be truly free. Twas always thus, twas always thus will be. --Keating

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    what ever you do don't do your exercises in the car.

    If you live in an apartment or somewhere that you don't feel comfortable doing your vocal exercises with whatever dynamic range you need then find a place to go and work that is quiet. If you can't hear yourself you're defeating the purpose (and probably causing yourself to over compensate...thereby hurting your voice)

    Its generally a good idea to do the exercises standing up, but sitting is fine. Although there is a proper sitting position for them and I can guarantee you that Honda, Nissan, or anyone else doesn't make their car seats with vocalists in mind.

    Your breathing stamina will also benefit form some general working out. Try going on some walks/jogs. This isn't always necessary, but it can help. Pavorotti is fat but has great lung capacity and diaphragm control.

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    Great thread, some nice practicing tips.
    I've heard and read several times that singing louder is much easier than doing so on lower volumes. Do you guys agree with that? The little singing I do is quite loud basically as loud as I can, so I don't really have experience with that myself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by S.Clause
    Great thread, some nice practicing tips.
    I've heard and read several times that singing louder is much easier than doing so on lower volumes. Do you guys agree with that? The little singing I do is quite loud basically as loud as I can, so I don't really have experience with that myself.
    Thats a tough queston really.

    Singing quietly definately involves more lung capacity/breathing stamina. Thats because when singing quietly you use more air and less voice, so your lungs empty faster. So singing quietly is mroe difficult from a endurance standpoint (if you do it properly that is). But, on the flip side of the coin, singing quietly is usually pretty accurate, whereas.....

    Singing loudly often causes a million pitch problems. You can only push your volume so much before you start releasing so much air or energy that the pitch gets pushed upwards. So people who try to sing louder than their voice is capable of will often be sharp on most if not all of their pitches.

    Its kind of the same thing as a golf swing...its easier to do the fundamentals right if you swing slowly, but the ball won't go as far. Swinging faster makes the ball go farther, but it has a much higher chance of going where you don't want it to go. Another analogy would be nailing a board. If you hammer slowly you're much more accurate with the nail, but it takes longer. If you go quickly, the nail goes further in on each hit, but you don't get much accomplished because you probably go to the hospital for a broken thumb.

    So there's two sides of the coin. Personally, I prefer to see people practice both ways but learn to sing quietly first and then expand both your volume and your range through singing louder.

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    straight to the heart. awesome voice.

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