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Thread: would anyone be interested in helping me learn a few things?

  1. #1
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    would anyone be interested in helping me learn a few things?

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    heres the thing. i know very little about mixing. im am going to make an investment soon in some new equiptment such as a pre amp, new mic, makeshift vocal booth, ect. now my problem is i dont want to get all this new equiptment and not know how to work it. so heres what i wanted help with. help me to train my ears. i can tell when a vocal sound is bad, i can tell when a vocal sound is good (for the most part). the main problem i have is i cannot listen to vocals that sound poor and tell what it is in the recording that is making it sound bad. so i was curious if anyone would be interested in checking out a sample of some vocals recorded on the basic mic im working with right now (recorded in my room) and they can do a few things for me, such as:

    1. make them sound "like they should", i.e. fix them up as good as you can using like noise reduction, eq, compressor, whatever the situation calls for.

    2. explain to me what it is exactly that you did. once i get a general idea i can begin to experiment and learn how the differences between my original version and your "hooked up" version.



    i feel this experiment will not only help me to work with what i have now, but also help to train my ears a bit more on the sound im looking for. if anyone is interested in helping me out please leave your email address and i will upload a sample and email you the link, or (i would prefer this one) if you have aol instant messenger leave your screen name this way not only can i send the file to you directly through the messenger, but i can also talk directly with you and get a better "hands on" feel.


    all help is greatly appreciated!

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    Talking

    What kind of hourly rate are we talking about here?

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    What type of vocal mic are you using now? What techniques do you use for recording vocals now? What medium are you recording to now? This will all help.

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    The only problem with this experiment is it will teach you how to polish a turd as opposed to avoiding creating turds in the first place.

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    The only problem with this experiment is it will teach you how to polish a turd as opposed to avoiding creating turds in the first place.
    Nicely put Tex!

    As asked, what are you using and what are you planning to get. Really, the best way to learn how to mix and record is to just do it. Trial and error and this BBS is going to be a good learning experience!
    "Peace, Pot, and Micro-Dot... Jesus loves you stoned or not!

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    PS

    Hope SMELLYFUZZ doesn't catch this thread or we are going to hear another "fucking newbie" comment!
    "Peace, Pot, and Micro-Dot... Jesus loves you stoned or not!

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    I was thinking of posting something like:


    "I know very little about cleaning. But I have a dirty apartment that needs cleaning, trash that could be taken out, etc. etc."

    . . . "Was wondering if anyone would be interested in doing it for me. And then, after you're done, tell me how you did it, and how you got it all so clean. Please contact me via email if you're willing to do it. It could be a great experiment and a learning experience for both of us."


    I didn't think it would go over very well, but I suppose it would be worth a try. What do you think, needmyownstudio? Maybe I could change my username to needmyownfreelabor.

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    Smile

    Do the intern deal at your nearest studio. Really.

    Or www.studiocovers.com

    Then come back with follow-up questions.

    MP

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    Yo NeedMOS! I know you weren't intending to push Chessrock's buttons, or anybody else's, but a lot of people here do this for a living, a second job, or their every waking minute hobby. Nobody is going to clean up tracks for you for free, which is about as much fun as washing dishes. I will tell you what I have learned by being stubborn, though, and tracking my own album, which was a real dumb idea, but worth it, in the end.
    Here's what I have learned about tracking vocals:
    1. (this applies to all tracking) Tracking is not mixing. The mission in tracking is to track so that the least possible amount of mixing is needed. Of course, mixing sets the relative volume of each track, and the extent to which the track is panned right or left. Everything else is trying to fix something that was done wrong in tracking. Either the musician sucked/screwed up, the instrument sucked, the song sucked, the room sucked, the mic sucked (either in general, or for that particular singer), the preamp sucked (see above), the gain structure was wrong, there was unwanted noise (either ambient, or coming from the gear itself), or the track was altered in such a way as to make it suck. This is usually called "processing".
    1a. This is a corollary of #1. If you have a great performance of a great song by a great musician with a great instrument into a great mic and a great preamp, in a great room, it can only suck so much, and a Chimpanzee could mix it.
    1b. Another corollary- Worry about the front end of the signal chain, rather than the back end, first. *Why* are you trying to use compression, FX, reverb, editing, EQ, etc. to fix a track that sucked? Record it again so that it does not suck!

    2.- Microphones are kind of like cameras, they require a photographer to select the gear and aim the thing. Microphones are instruments that a singer plays, like a guitarist plays a guitar. A great guitarist on a cheap guitar sounds better than a bad player on a great guitar. Not only does a singer have to learn to sing, but they must learn to play that mic, and not all mics are created equal. With any given mic, you have to know it's sensitivity, its proximity field, it's pickup profile, like you know your instrument.
    2.a- a corollary- There is *no* best mic, preamp, or placement, except in terms of a specific singer, room, song, key, mix. Some people weren't meant to sing through certain mics, even *very* good mics. There is no mic/preamp combo so good that I can't find an excellent singer who can make it sound like crap. There is no mic that's best for female vocals, black vocals, rap vocals, or left handed vocals. so-
    2.b- corollary- You need options in vocal mics, even if you record only yourself, as different songs will demand different sounds, as will different mixes. If you are a singer, find the mic that makes *you* sound good, pay *whatever* it costs, then get several good cheap mics with a variety of uses to try out on other singers with different needs.

    3. The energy a great performer brings to a great live performance is rarely useful in studio recording. The mic does not care how cool you look, and is not impressed by your deep blue eyes. It respects precision and control.


    In general, Need, it is a hell of a lot easier to record a good clean track than to try and fix one that has problems in the mix. The gift/skill of doing that, while valuable, is just that- valuable work, and something that you pay for in a mixing engineer. But if you want respect from the nice engineers, create tracks that don't require fixing. If the tracks have problems, track them again, until they don't.-Good Luck.-Richie

  10. #10
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    Holy Moly, Richard my man, that was some good advice. Got any advice on getting the chicks?

    dave

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