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Thread: mixing reverb question

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by keith.rogers View Post
    If the reverb is on a separate, stereo aux/bus and your tracks are panned, the reverb will still reflect that...
    This is not necessarily true. Many popular reverb units and plugins actually sum the stereo input to mono before processing. They might apply slight different process to each side of the output so that there is some noticeable "stereoness" to it, but it won't actually follow the panning at the input. There was a chart out there somewhere that listed a bunch of plugins and which were "true stereo", "dual mono", or "mono>stereo", but I can't seem to find it right now.

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    To me it depends on the song. Sometimes I want cohesion, sometimes not. But, yes, changing the parameters does help. I think somebody else mentioned changing the predelay, etc, yes I do that. Here's something I've done to separate. One guitar track dry but only panned say at about 60-70. Copy the track, put the reverb of choice on the new track, but way heavier than normal. Pan that hard with volume at 0. Start bringing the wet track up until you hear the guitar in one place but the reverb is a little to the outside. Keeps reverb out of the middle zone.

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    you can use 2 different reverbs

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    Quote Originally Posted by scopus View Post
    hey lets say i have 2 very similar sounds that share similar frequencies and i want to have good separation. Besides panning wouldn't it make sense to use 2 different reverbs? I mean if i have 2 similar sounds in the same hall reverb send doesnt that increase the likelyhood of them fighting eachother and better to use two different hall verbs?
    If you do this, the general rule of thumb is shorter-brighter / longer-darker. Same goes for stacking delays.

    No it doesn't increase the likelihood of them fighting. You decrease that likelihood by doing the opposite. Bus them both to the same verb. The manipulation of the source is what will preserve your clarity, not the distinctiveness of each verb.

    Its not uncommon for pro engineers to stack reverbs, but when we do this, there are very specific changes we're trying to achieve. And there are very specific things we are listing for in the blend.

    Google or youtube stacking reverbs, layering reverbs, combining reverbs, or reverb tutorial.

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    some say that each instrument goes in their own sonic space to create separation.
    Try different things and choose what sound better to you.
    One technique is panning left and right and add reverb to the opposite side (instrument on the right, reverb on the left and so one)

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    You can actually use 2 separate reverbs to help separate the two sounds. A short ER verb with a lot of diffusion can be just the thing to get a track to sit in the mix where you want it, you may have to do a bit of compression, some fader level automation, and eq’n to keep it under control. Ideally though you should try to get the tracks to sit in the mix together before adding ambiance. Going back to the EQ and do a bit more work there first will give the best results. As stated above, I do most of my EQ moves in mono. I also continue to check my mix as I go along, in mono. There is no right or wrong absolute answer here, use whatever tools you need, to give you the results you are after.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Billal Dahman View Post
    The Basic Reverb Mixing Techniques
    Your Kick Drum and Bass Guitar should be 100% dry.
    Use more reverb on the toms and cymbals than the snare.
    Use enough to push guitars and keyboard behind the vocals and near the snare in depth.
    Ways To Use Reverb Like A Pro
    Be Selective. Amateurs throw reverb on everything. ...
    Use Pre-Delay. Imagine adding reverb to a lead vocal. ...
    Consider Density. Density is how closely packed the reflections in a reverb are. ...
    Time The Tail. Reverbs that ring out too long will rob your mixes of clarity. ...
    Favor Short Reverbs. ...
    Shape The Return. ...
    Use Less. ...
    Go For Mono.
    The ultimate guide to effects: reverb. Reverberation (or 'reverb') effects are omnipresent, both in the real world and in music production. Judicious use of reverb can make the difference between a professional recording and something that sounds like it was recorded in a bedroom, adding depth and fullness to the sound
    Reverb is the most important effect you have access to. ... Reverberation, or reverb, is a series of acoustic reflections that occur within a space when sound is created. The timing, frequency, and volume of the reflections will vary depending on the size, shape, and contents of the space.
    While I agree with some of the comments but not all:

    Your Kick Drum and Bass Guitar should be 100% dry. While generully not always, reveb on bass can be an interesting effect, reverb on kick can make it sound big for example in reggae.

    Use more reverb on the toms and cymbals than the snare. I very rarely use reverb on cymbals unless the room was very dry. However depends on the song.

    Favor Short Reverbs. Again depends on the song.

    Go For Mono. I never go mono on reverb I love the stereo spread, delays I sometimes have mono.

    I am just pointing out that in the recording world there are no rules, sometimes a wrong thing can sound great, thats how the engineers in the past came up with a lot of great ideas, by experimenting.

    Alan

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    Quote Originally Posted by witzendoz View Post
    While I agree with some of the comments but not all:

    Your Kick Drum and Bass Guitar should be 100% dry. While generully not always, reveb on bass can be an interesting effect, reverb on kick can make it sound big for example in reggae.

    Use more reverb on the toms and cymbals than the snare. I very rarely use reverb on cymbals unless the room was very dry. However depends on the song.

    Favor Short Reverbs. Again depends on the song.

    Go For Mono. I never go mono on reverb I love the stereo spread, delays I sometimes have mono.

    I am just pointing out that in the recording world there are no rules, sometimes a wrong thing can sound great, thats how the engineers in the past came up with a lot of great ideas, by experimenting.

    Alan
    I agree, there has been quite a few hit songs, with reverb on bass and kick drum.
    Reverb and delay on bass is becoming somewhat popular with some bassist. Using verbs and delay pedals as they record.

  10. #19
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    yeh as keith mention always some time switch to mono to hear for phasing issues.

    Also i keep instruments and vocal on different reverb send, and usually the drums reverb is very short almost always at me

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