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Thread: silence at the end of tracks

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    silence at the end of tracks

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    How much silence doyou put at the end of a track? I've been putting zero, which suits my short attention span when I'm listening on my ipod, but I've noticed it doesn't quite sound normal, which concerns me since I'm about to make an actual CD that some people might possibly buy. I'm not talking about fadeouts, my songs actually end, but how much silence do you allow afterward? Thanks for any help!

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    When you assemble your tracks in your chosen ordrer that context kicks in. Listening in that context is where you'd add or remove for the feel and timing.
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    2 seconds for a vintage album
    1 to 1.5 seconds for a standard Pop album
    0 seconds for a Punk album

    It's the law, obey all speed limits!
    Tom Volpicelli
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    Cool, as with every aspect of the process, discretion is in order. Good to know there's a rule of thumb to start with, so I know what my discretion might be deviating from.

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    Quote Originally Posted by masteringhouse View Post
    2 seconds for a vintage album
    1 to 1.5 seconds for a standard Pop album
    0 seconds for a Punk album
    And negative five seconds for a Pink Floyd album .

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    Quote Originally Posted by tc4b View Post
    Cool, as with every aspect of the process, discretion is in order. Good to know there's a rule of thumb to start with, so I know what my discretion might be deviating from.
    Please don't use my post as a rule of thumb, it was totally tongue-in-cheek.

    I find the best way to space material is to start playing at the end of a song, stop looking at the computer monitor, and when you feel the next song should come in hit stop noticing where the play head is positioned/scroll stopped/etc. Then place the next song there and see if you feel the same about it a second time.

    At times I also like to use the tempo of the song before and make the next song come in on the beat if the tempos are close. Using the procedure above usually ends up with the same result as we naturally want things to remain in tempo.

    If a song is entirely a different tempo, like going from a fast to a slow song, you may want to increase the time slightly so that a listener is allowed to make the transition (heart rate and breathing slows down slightly).

    There's no science, it's all in what you feel. I suggest not doing assembly when you are aggravated or rushed as there is a tenancy to create shorter pauses. Likewise don't assemble when you're too stoned or they might be too long.

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthSIDE Glen View Post
    And negative five seconds for a Pink Floyd album .

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    I always leave as little silence as I can on a song file. But that doesn't mean the next song has to start right away. When you assemble the songs for a CD, you can assign the length of time between songs.

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    I've found that, with my projects, generally a week or two between tracks is sufficient. Some of my lesser efforts might need twice that.
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    @ Teysha's post.

    Another vaguely related question for the mastering guys - I'd assume you want the length of silence on the files sent in for mastering to be exactly equal to what is wanted for the final mix, but do you want it to ACTUALLY be silence (I.e - faded out to -infinity) or is that something you'd do anyway during mastering and is it useful to have typical ambient background hum present just in case you need to build a noise profile?
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a little dicier." - David Foster Wallace (1962-2008)

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewPeterson7 View Post
    @ Teysha's post.

    Another vaguely related question for the mastering guys - I'd assume you want the length of silence on the files sent in for mastering to be exactly equal to what is wanted for the final mix, but do you want it to ACTUALLY be silence (I.e - faded out to -infinity) or is that something you'd do anyway during mastering and is it useful to have typical ambient background hum present just in case you need to build a noise profile?
    I think it's always better to err on the side of having the fade and air before start time just a "hair" longer than is what is actually going to be used. So if there is a little lingering of music or silence that' is preferred. I know I will always just fine adjust top and tails on every song. Sometimes by just a minute amount, but it's always nipped.

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