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Thread: Zoom R16 and DAW

  1. #11
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    Turre...I expect you are correct...For a first timer getting into audio work....I found Audacity pretty easy...and I've learned that I can bring in 8 tracks and do a cumbersome job of editing...but it's slow...not as precise as I think things should be...I started out doing digital conversions from reel to reel and cassette...for this Audacity is just fine...but now that I'm recording in 8 track...I need something better....

    I'm doing "barely ok" with Reaper...an awful lot to learn yet...but since my R16 is supposed to be able to be the front end for a DAW...it seems to me that things would be quicker and easier if I can use the R16 and at least
    get my initial mix down quickly....

    Thanks for the help...

  2. #12
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    R16 as the control surface wont do a whole lot to hide the DAW and its concepts from you.

    May I ask you what sort of thing you're actually working on? Just thinking, if quick and easy are important qualities to get an initial mix-down then why not just mix on the R16 itself? Coming from a 4-track background myself, I discovered that involving computers in music-making killed both productivity and all the fun, and that despite its limitations (or perhaps because of them), sticking to the standalone R16 was far more productive than any DAW I tried. Of course, it all depends on your needs and if do you need to edit then the R16 doesn't have much to offer on that front.

  3. #13
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    We’ve been down that road of doubting why NOT to use a DAW before. Because it takes a little time to learn is not going to decrease your creativity once you learn it. I have an R16 that I originally used to record with. It’s a nice little unit but does not compare to any DAW out there. Mine is set up now as a control surface for Reaper and it works fine. I keep the inputs all connected to various things I use a lot and it’s quick and easy. The control surface is really convenient and keeps that old feeling of analog knobs and faders alive.
    Just A Song Writer..........

  4. #14
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    Well, each to their own.

    Obviously the DAW enables things that simply are not possible otherwise and people like myself who are less enamored of them are in the minority these days, but the OP doesn't exactly come off as somebody who's in love with them. Hence the question.

  5. #15
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    Yup....I understand.....and I am certainly not trying to disparage anyone who wants to record and produce in any way they chose. But......three things in this case. The OP seemed to already have decided he wanted to try a DAW and seemed to have a good idea as to why he wanted to do that. And...since he already had the R16.....he likely well understood that he had the option of just using it alone to record if he wanted to. As well.........he was already asking about using the R16 as a control surface and was looking for increased ease for Reaper input.

    I too was one who went from the 4 and 8 and 16 and 24 track digital units with knobs and faders and switches.............and I certainly hesitated long and often about going to a DAW........so I get where his trepidation comes from for sure....and I'm sure that you do too. It's at such times of hesitation that we often think the trouble of learning is not worth it and can be subject to doubts and excuses that serve to hold us back. My only concern was that the OP keep trying until he could decide for himself................after learning a DAW........whether or not it was worth it for him.

    And....if I'm being 100% honest here........a while back we had a member who was VERY vocal about his preference for not using a DAW..........and he attacked and insulted many of us here for our positive views on DAW's. I am likely FAR too sensitive to that subject now......so please don't take any offense to my posts. You don't seem like that guy at all.
    Just A Song Writer..........

  6. #16
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    I'm somewhat partial to the recording decks. I really enjoyed working on my AW16G and AW1600 units, but moving files and managing projects isn't as easy as with the Zoom. I love being able to replace the SD card when I need to move to a different project. You can buy cards for $5 a pop which is less than I used to pay for 7" reels of tape back in the 70s.

    I finally bought an 8 channel interface (Tascam 16x08) to connect to Reaper directly, but the majority of my recording has been in my Zoom R24. I have mixed some things on the Zoom, and have edited others in Reaper. I have yet do to any extensive recording through my interface. I want to do a comparison to the Tascam and Zoom preamps.

    For me, having both techniques available is the best solution. The Zoom really shines when you are talking about live onsite recording. It's way less complicated than having an interface, and a computer. Plug a snake into the back and set up your mikes on the stage. Once levels get set, hit record and walk away. REALLY easy and foolproof.

    If you need the flexibility of Reaper, its there. Best of both worlds!

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TalismanRich View Post

    For me, having both techniques available is the best solution. The Zoom really shines when you are talking about live onsite recording. It's way less complicated than having an interface, and a computer. Plug a snake into the back and set up your mikes on the stage. Once levels get set, hit record and walk away. REALLY easy and foolproof.
    I have a studio set-up, and a portable rig for live or off-site recordings. It is, as you say, easy and foolproof. But I use interface plus laptop. Plug snake into interface, set up mikes, set levels, hit record than you're off and running.

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    “The Zoom really shines when you are talking about live onsite recording.”

    That’s for sure! If portability is part of your needs then the Zoom’s are excellent for that. Light weight and battery driven.....what could be better.

    I used to transfer tracks from the Zoom to Reaper at first for editing and effects.....and then back to the Zoom for mixing. As I got better with Reaper........and began to understand the use of the Zoom as a control surface.......and how to record in Reaper.........it was just a natural step to record only in Reaper. I recently took the R16 to someone’s home to record them playing guitar and singing. He was interested in getting a Zoom for himself after that session. I encouraged him to do that. Where he goes beyond that is up to him.
    Just A Song Writer..........

  9. #19
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    If you use a Zoom16 or so, install the drivers and install the software, (I use Presonus), install the Zoom as a Mackie interface, set all up using this kind of interface. Then it works smooth and secure. Of course the in DAW software configuration is time consuming, as all settings and pre-sets are to be configured by choice and by hand, nothing is pre-installed. But once you have done this time consuming thing, it works great.

  10. #20
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    I used the r16 to record a live performance of our band using 8 ch.'s via the soundboard aux outs - sending (1) the drum mix (electric/acoustic mix on separate gear), (2) bass, (3) rhythm, (4) lead guitar, (5-8) vocals. All outputs were pre-fader and the gain/levels adjusted at the r16. After recording I sent the WAV files to my PC which gave me 4 sets worth of recording (approx. 3hrs) From here you can import them into any DAW to dissect them into individual song, or edit the set mix. I usually use audacity to cut the songs up - simply import the wave files set the trim points and then save them as audacity for further editing in audacity or wav for exporting into other DAW's. I've had good results with Sonar, FL Studios, and Reaper.

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