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Thread: Teac 3340 questions

  1. #1
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    Question Teac 3340 questions

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    I just scored this machine from a co-worker. It was really dusty, and a bit dirty, but a couple hours with a fine brush, compressed air, lemon oil, and alcohol cleaned it up nice. It appears to be in pretty good shape, but it's missing the tape stop arm. Will it run without it, or do I need to bypass the switch?

    Also any tips about problems to look for on this machine would be appreciated.

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    Found a decent pic of the same machine:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 3340front2-jpg  

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    Rather then by-passing the "stop arm" as you described it, it might be better to try and get that fixed as it also serves as a tensioner arm to keep the tape from spooling poorly and getting stretched.

    I used to have one of those machines too and it was capable of making a great recording if it was calibrated properly.

    In what way is it broken or gone, ( the right tensioner, I mean).

    Post an actual pic of your machine so we can see the damage.

    Cheers!

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    It would not be impossible to fabricate a new tensioner arm as I had to do until I acquired one from a junker I bought for parts.

    If you have the original Machine (without solenoid control of the tansport) be prepared for trouble with the silver transport switch.
    The tape reel clamps also tend to break easily.

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    Ghost:

    I ran it last night by pushing on the tape-stop switch with a pencil. The transport works, but the pinch-roller mechanism is really stiff. The solenoid can't engage it without help. Gonna have to pull it apart to see what's up with that. Hopefully it's just a lubrication issue. This thing obviously sat in a garage for a long time.

    Don't have any way to post a pic of my machine. No digital camera or scanner. It's identical to the one above, though I think mine looks a bit better. I found the inside part of the stop arm hanging inside the machine by it's spring. It looks like the outer part was just broken off. I plan on getting a new arm for it if it turns out the rest of the machine is worth the trouble. From what I've been able to dig up on the net TEAC is pretty good about parts for older machines.

    Derek:

    Yeah, I have been known to fabricate a few things out of neccesity. Rather just R&R though.

    It is the "original" machine with the three position switch just like the one above. The switch seems to work fine, but thanks for the heads-up.

    Everything inside looks to be in good shape too. The rubber & plastic looks like new. I don't think this thing saw much use. The electronics have a couple issues: there seems to be too much noise in the R channel. Maybe caps. It's a steady hiss that's a lot like tape noise, with occasional crackling/breakup. Seems to be getting better though the longer it's on.

    On the upside this thing does sound quite good. I'd almost forgotten what it's like to work with VU meters. Looks like I'll be ordering a service manual, and a stop arm.

    Looking forward to tracking some drums with this thing.

    Thanks dudes!

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    Old electrolytic capacitors can often be "reformed" by reuse. The best way is to use a variac to bring up the supply voltage very slowly.

    If Tascam cannot supply the tension arm, here is how I made mine:

    Cut a piece of 1/32" brass to the same size as the left tension arm and braze or silver solder it to the piece you rescued from inside the machine*. (Check the orientation before you do this)

    Find an old tape guide from a defunct 1/4" machine and mount it to the other end with a countersunk machine screw. If you have a lathe, you can turn ths piece yourself.

    *Mount the arm with the spring causing the arm to be horizontal and depressing the microswitch when there is no tape in the machine.

    This worked for years and was only replaced because the brass did not match the stainless steel in color.

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    I used the variac method to power it up the first time. I've only powered it down once since then to remove the variac. I'll leave it on for a few days, and see what happens. There's a lot of caps in this sucker! Would be quite a soldering project.

    I don't have a lathe myself, but my brother has one. He's good at fabricating stuff as well so that's always an option if I can't find one. As long as I can tear him away from the lake car he's building for a bit.

    Thanks again!

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