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Thread: TASCAM 34b 1/4" @ 15ipc = 24bit??

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    TASCAM 34b 1/4" @ 15ipc = 24bit??

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    Howdy,
    I'm new to analog recording, and I'm interested in the TASCAM 34b. I'm just curious as to what bit and sampling rate these 4 track 1/4" recorders record at. Is it 24 bit, 96K? or 16 bit, 48K? Am I way off? Or thinking the wrong thing? I'm just curious.

    And also, I don't know if anyone else saw it, but the other day there was a TASCAM 44 on eBay this was the only one I saw on eBay at that time that had XLR ins and outs. I was bummed because it sold for only $380 and I decided to pass on it because I thought I needed to do a little more research.

    So, since the 44's are so rare (from what I've read) and I'm not likely to find one anytime soon, I'm thinking about the 34b. Which doesn't have XLR ins or outs, but just RCA's and 1/4". Am I wrong or are XLR inputs and outputs better than RCA? If I do get that 34b I'm going to get that 8 channel mixer with RCA inputs (I forgot the name of it).

    I hope all that made sense. Basically, what bitrate are 1/4" recorders, and is RCA better than XLR?

    Thanks alot guys!!
    Corey

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    There is no bit rate on analog gear.


    I would delete this post before the others see it.

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    First welcome to the analog site corey.

    second The Recorders you are looking at do not have anything at all that relates to 24 bit 16 bit recording. That type of recorder that deals with those rates are digital recorder,s and are in a whole differant world. Here we deal with Analog recorders that use Magnetic tape as the medium to record to and do not get into digital at all.

    Im going to jump ahead here and tell you that the 34b is a real nice recorder and no you dont need the xlr,s on the recorder.

    But before any of us go any futher about recording or recorders it would help alot if you told us what you want to do with the recorder. Do you want to record music, a band, or just your self, or what?

    Then we can make some suggestions on a good route for you to go.

    Gary

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    I worded that badly, I meant, is there a bit rate that's equivalent to the quality of a 1/4" r2r recorder. I was just curious. I also want to know so that I can decide on what to mix down to. I have a Br-834 that I use for recording rough versions of my songs, I could use that for mixdown. Or, I'm thinking about a laptop with a 24/96 card, and I just bought Adobe Audition, so I could do that too. Would I be gaining anything by using a computer for mixdown verses if I were to just use my Boss 864? It's 16bit 44.1. Or I could get a 24bit minidisc recorder. I just need to know if theres that much info to capture that it would sound better if I used a higher quality recorder

    I want to use the r2r just to record my songs. It's mostly guitar and my voice. I do sometimes use bass, and some other sound effects too if the song needs it. Oh yeah, and I like to use weird things for percussion (coffeecans, boxes, etc)

    Thanks
    Corey

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    Some digital enthusiasts will attest to the quality of 24/192 being equivalent to professional analog recorders because of the thicker sound that this encoding standard uses to capture similar dynamics and frequency response compared to an open reel recorder running at 15ips with standard track widths.

    The reality is that both formats can sound excellent as long as you know what your doing as an engineer and musician and are using supporting ancillary equipment such as good mixers, microphones, compressors and proper acoustics.

    Playing skill and mixing/recording technique and talent can make up for the short comings of poor equipment and lack of those qualities will make high end gear sound like crap.

    You will find most of the participants in this forum to be analog enthusiast because we love the sound quality and simplicity of tracking without latency issues and mixing with a mouse through endless menus and sub menus.

    If your experience and comfort level is in the digital realm, I am not quite sure how a 4 track reel to reel is going to be of interest to you when there are software based recorders out there with 128 stereo tracks?

    The traditional, professional method of recording these days in large budget facilities is to do initial tracking on an analog multi-track machine then transfer that into a digital environment for editing and then back through an analog console for mix-down to a 24/192 format or a 1/2 track stereo analog format which can then be professionally mastered for commercial release and distribution.

    In a non-professional situation, whatever gets the job done is the right answer.

    Either way, I wish you good luck and happy recording which ever route you decide to take.

    Cheers!

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    Originally posted by filmdude11
    I worded that badly
    Really? You were serious? I thought you were joking!

    I meant, is there a bit rate that's equivalent to the quality of a 1/4" r2r recorder.
    That's like asking if there is a bit rate equivalent to the quality of a guitar.

    Analog gear has frequency response issues and noise. Digital gear has anti-aliasing filters and quantisation issues. They are not really comparable.
    Random Pavarotti Disease Victim.

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    I should point out that "bitrate" only applies to compressed audio/video formats........ the term you're looking for is bitdepth or wordsize.......

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    Ok, I have another question. Are you guys using analog because you cant afford digital? Or because you prefer it?

    Thanks
    Corey

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    Originally posted by Blue Bear Sound
    I should point out that "bitrate" only applies to compressed audio/video formats........ the term you're looking for is bitdepth or wordsize.......
    And a bit depth s/n similar to a 34b would be around 14 or so? (Although hiss at -80 would be a lot nicer than the same in digi-noise.)
    Placebo stomps 96k ....... Recent projects
    Ray Catfish Copeland 'Got Love Jim Goodman 'Southern Steel

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    I just want to have something to compare it to before I jump in and get something. I know I would like working with analog more than digital, but I'm not going to ignore quality.

    Maybe I just need to hear something recorded with the 34b.

    I think 1/4" cassette tape sounds horrible. So I'm concerned about this recorder sounding similar.


    Corey

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