Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: new to analog

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    17

    new to analog

    Sign in to disable this ad
    Hi, I'm interested in going analog. We just recorded to Pro Tools, and it just didn't work out.

    We've decided that for our next recording session, we want a good setup in our basement. As much analog as we can do.

    We're into that "dirty" sound that you hear on Pearl Jam albums, etc.

    We could probably pull it off on 8 tracks, 16 would be better, but possibly out of the price range. 16 would allow us to double tracks, however 8 would force us to really get it right (which we would have time to do since we aren't paying someone by the hour)

    We would like to mix it ourselves, but be able to send it out to get professionally mastered. What mix format is the best way to go about that?

    Another option we have been considering is recording the rhythm tracks to analog, and doing the leads and vocals into analog pre's into digital, where we could add effects cheaper and easier.

    Also, what are good mic pre's for vocals on analog?

    I would say we could get EVERYTHING onto 8 tracks, however, having 10-12 would be helpful.

    All of us are ready to take the analog plunge, though.

    Edit: Not entirely new to analog. I would say that one hint we had was that our practice tapes done on a tascam 424 sounded more like we wanted it to than our Pro Tools sessions. However, the Pro Tools unquestionalbly sounded more professional and finished so we went with it.
    What is Soul?
    Soul is a hamhock in your cornflakes.

    -Funkadelic "What is Soul?"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    7,098
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    1195184
    Quote Originally Posted by superstupid
    Hi, I'm interested in going analog. We just recorded to Pro Tools, and it just didn't work out.

    We've decided that for our next recording session, we want a good setup in our basement. As much analog as we can do.

    We're into that "dirty" sound that you hear on Pearl Jam albums, etc.

    We could probably pull it off on 8 tracks, 16 would be better, but possibly out of the price range. 16 would allow us to double tracks, however 8 would force us to really get it right (which we would have time to do since we aren't paying someone by the hour)

    We would like to mix it ourselves, but be able to send it out to get professionally mastered. What mix format is the best way to go about that?

    Another option we have been considering is recording the rhythm tracks to analog, and doing the leads and vocals into analog pre's into digital, where we could add effects cheaper and easier.

    Also, what are good mic pre's for vocals on analog?

    I would say we could get EVERYTHING onto 8 tracks, however, having 10-12 would be helpful.

    All of us are ready to take the analog plunge, though.

    Edit: Not entirely new to analog. I would say that one hint we had was that our practice tapes done on a tascam 424 sounded more like we wanted it to than our Pro Tools sessions. However, the Pro Tools unquestionalbly sounded more professional and finished so we went with it.
    Ok, for 8 tracks:

    If you can get a lower use TASCAM 388 in great shape then I'd try that. (It's a self contained mixer + open reel "portastudio"). Look here:

    http://www.nowhereradio.com/artists/...d=1609&alid=-1

    There are several songs recorded on the TASCAM 388. Listen to them. Remember that no compression nor any effects were used at all.

    Failing the above or in addition I'd get the TASCAM 38, TASCAM TSR-8 or the TEAC 80-8 with a matching mixer such as the TASCAM m-30, m-35, m-50, m-512, m-520 or any of the m-300 series mixers.

    ***MUST BE IN GOOD, WELL MAINTAINED, NOT ABUSED CONDITION***

    (Local purchases are always better but if shipped, make CERTAIN that proper packing rules are followed).

    Stick to TASCAM/TEAC when looking for your Analog gear. Parts and full support are there still when needed.

    External mic pres are not needed. The above gear is more than capable of high quality mic amping!

    Suggestion: stick to 1/4" - 1/2" tape. Above that and you'll run into serious expense.

    "Mix format": I think if you can score a TASCAM 22-2 or 32-2 and mix down at 15ips then you'll be alright. You can then take the 1/4" tape to a mastering house.

    Good luck!

    Daniel
    Last edited by cjacek; 03-14-2005 at 23:39.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Invercargill, New Zealand
    Age
    47
    Posts
    533
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    639
    Quote Originally Posted by superstupid
    We could probably pull it off on 8 tracks, 16 would be better, but possibly out of the price range. 16 would allow us to double tracks, however 8 would force us to really get it right (which we would have time to do since we aren't paying someone by the hour)
    A Tascam MSR-16 would be worth considering. An economical 1/2" format, and an easy recorder to use. I have seen some on eBay at quite good pricing - unfortunately all in the US. They were NZ$11,500 dealer price new in '92 (that would translated to around US$5,250 in '92, or around $8,200 now, but the US price may well have been different). I seem to remember ARP saying they were going for around US$800-$1,000.

    If you can do it in 8 tracks then there are a heap of options there - from the Tascam 388 that Daniel recommended to the TSR-8 1/2".

    Quote Originally Posted by superstupid
    We would like to mix it ourselves, but be able to send it out to get professionally mastered. What mix format is the best way to go about that?
    I'm guessing either 1/4" two track or digital - possibly DAT.

    Quote Originally Posted by superstupid
    Another option we have been considering is recording the rhythm tracks to analog, and doing the leads and vocals into analog pre's into digital, where we could add effects cheaper and easier.
    The analogue purists won't like me, but this doesn't sound like the silliest thing in the world. You could also record analogue and then transfer to digital - 24/96 - for mixing. Just transfer all of your analogue tracks to digital in one pass, saves trying to synch them later on.

    Cya
    Andrew

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    7,098
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Rep Power
    1195184
    Quote Originally Posted by arjoll
    The analogue purists won't like me, but this doesn't sound like the silliest thing in the world. You could also record analogue and then transfer to digital - 24/96 - for mixing. Just transfer all of your analogue tracks to digital in one pass, saves trying to synch them later on.
    I think that's perfectly acceptable.

    ~Daniel

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by arjoll
    The analogue purists won't like me, but this doesn't sound like the silliest thing in the world. You could also record analogue and then transfer to digital - 24/96 - for mixing. Just transfer all of your analogue tracks to digital in one pass, saves trying to synch them later on.

    Cya
    Andrew
    I have an M-Audio Audiophile 2496 and n-track with which I could do that. I would have to say that for convenience, digital cannot be beat. That was the best thing for my songwriting (and for fixing the protools recording that the hack that recorded us gave us), the convenience, and the ability to record more than 4 tracks, etc. I fully intend to use this setup for putting a mix to a CD to listen to in a car stereo, etc, experiment with effects, EQ, etc; so that I know what needs to be fixed on the analog end.

    I was looking into a Mackie 16 channel mixer for this studio setup, and getting one or two good preamps and some NS-10's. We are planning on getting this to sound reasonably professional. We can afford to spend some money on a semi-professional setup, as long as we aren't paying by the hour in a studio that requires us to take a week off to record because it is out of town.

    There isn't a whole lot in the way of analog in Indianapolis, but there are plenty of pro-tools hacks.
    What is Soul?
    Soul is a hamhock in your cornflakes.

    -Funkadelic "What is Soul?"

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. For all you old guys
    By guitarfreak12 in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 88
    Last Post: 10-07-2010, 05:35
  2. Times are changing....intresting read....
    By chadsxe in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 04-10-2005, 22:41
  3. Whats the point with big consoles?
    By Chris Klein in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 03-08-2005, 06:13
  4. Reed/Beaty Boys on analog tape
    By Bobby Darko in forum Analog Recording & Mixing - Tape & Gear
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-03-2005, 01:02
  5. CD Writing
    By Stephen Jones in forum Cakewalk / Sonar Forum
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-12-2001, 15:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •