Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Utter novice - Wider frequency response needed for super low bass?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    348
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Quote Originally Posted by paulears View Post
    I think you just need to try some because they don’t just stop at X Hertz they start to tail off and with eq I suspect there isn’t a problem
    i would look at specs instead of just trying them at random
    then after checking their low end do try them if you can find anyplace that will let you do that
    most will refuse returns on mikes for health reasons but you might be able to rent some to try


    this one is only down 5dB at 20cps
    and is quite affordable
    our church singer who was in the business uses this and also does FOH mixing and suggested it for our church to use

    http://www.mxlmics.com/microphones/s...ar-pattern.gif
    mike is mxl 990

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    ArizonaMaybe
    Age
    69
    Posts
    9,516
    Thanks
    207
    Thanked 164 Times in 152 Posts
    Rep Power
    9581210
    Quote Originally Posted by molassascookie View Post
    I am a bass singer who's looking to get into voice acting and possibly starting an a cappella group. I was looking at microphones and saw that for most high-quality voice mics, the lowest frequency response is usually 40hz, or just below a piano E1, which is the lowest note of a string double bass.

    However, I employ the same technique that singers like Tim Foust use to get lower than an E1 (the strongest example is the D1 he sings in Home Free's cover of Honey I'm Good by Andy Grammer on Youtube, a few seconds into the bass line at 2:30).

    So my question is, do I need to find a mic with a lower frequency response than 40hz in order to pick up notes like this, or will the natural overtones create a sound that is just as deep?
    Here is page with a plot for a typical 'rolled off vocal mic -but showing the actual proximity effect bass boosts at the close distances we actually use them. Still +many dB down there..
    They're rolled off so it won't be a complete unbalanced mess.

    Also consider; Do you really want to emulate (create) the sound effect of a voice with a strong fundamental of 'a low E'?

    There's this thing of 'image size'. Things have -well, 'natural' places in a mix. I.e. it's one thing to have the chordal' throat overtones of notes originating from down there.. But a strong fundamental..?

    The listener's image of 'your lips around my ear..


    Microphone Characteristics Vital To Know For Sound Reinforcement - Page 4 of 4 - ProSoundWeb
    Placebo stomps 96k ....... Recent projects
    Ray Catfish Copeland 'Got Love Jim Goodman 'Southern Steel

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    ArizonaMaybe
    Age
    69
    Posts
    9,516
    Thanks
    207
    Thanked 164 Times in 152 Posts
    Rep Power
    9581210
    Quote Originally Posted by mr average View Post
    ..this one is only down 5dB at 20cps
    and is quite affordable
    our church singer who was in the business uses this and also does FOH mixing and suggested it for our church to use

    http://www.mxlmics.com/microphones/s...ar-pattern.gif
    mike is mxl 990
    So... and now the engineer has to filter and correct the response even more for a usable balance, and image size.

    add..
    Consider; the rumble/artifacts, let alone 'pop filtering issues, of a mic like that -hand held or otherwise.
    Placebo stomps 96k ....... Recent projects
    Ray Catfish Copeland 'Got Love Jim Goodman 'Southern Steel

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    348
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mixsit View Post
    So... and now the engineer has to filter and correct the response even more for a usable balance, and image size.

    add..
    Consider; the rumble/artifacts, let alone 'pop filtering issues, of a mic like that -hand held or otherwise.
    the only thing necessary is to eq the low end a little differently than before

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    ArizonaMaybe
    Age
    69
    Posts
    9,516
    Thanks
    207
    Thanked 164 Times in 152 Posts
    Rep Power
    9581210
    Quote Originally Posted by mr average View Post
    the only thing necessary is to eq the low end a little differently than before
    I.e.. Get rid of all the excessive and problematic low end..

    Ever touch mics with full response down there?
    May as well use a QTC-1. No handling noise, no provimity effect, less 'pop sensitivity..
    But again. Why?
    Placebo stomps 96k ....... Recent projects
    Ray Catfish Copeland 'Got Love Jim Goodman 'Southern Steel

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    348
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mixsit View Post
    I.e.. Get rid of all the excessive and problematic low end..

    Ever touch mics with full response down there?
    May as well use a QTC-1. No handling noise, no provimity effect, less 'pop sensitivity..
    But again. Why?
    to give the client what he asked for which in this case is a very low bass note.

    ask him why he really needs that.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    essex
    Posts
    2,531
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 343 Times in 312 Posts
    Rep Power
    3901875
    Most large diaphragm mics can manage bass - voice, electric and acoustic bass, pipe organs and amplified synth sounds really well. Even U87s lose 5dB by the time they're below what we can properly hear. This simply doesn't make them poor on bass, and that MXL has a drop too - in this case, around 3dB. You can so easily make up this gain if you want, but there's really no need as bass is potent in quantity. You seem to have two real world choices. A large diaphragm condenser of some kind, or a dynamic specially designed for bass - and again, there are quite a few.

    I'm a little surprised by the low voice range quoted. The lowest note typically seen for bass singers is the same as the bass guitar - the bottom E which is 41Hz, a 5 string bass, with the bottom B comes in at 31Hz, and I can record that successfully with dozens of microphones.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    I googled a few random mics, and one stood out (though I admit I spent 3 minutes on this exercise). Warm Audio WA-87, a "clone" of the famous Neumann U87, goes pretty low. Warm's frequency chart shows it going all the way to 20hz, the lowest frequency of human hearing.

    In omni mode, it's down maybe 3dB at 20 hz. Not bad. In cardiod mode, which most people use for vocals, it's down maybe 5 dB at 20 hz.

    The fact is, though, that in cardiod there will be a boost to the lowest frequencies due to "proximity effect" that will probably more than make up for that drop.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    essex
    Posts
    2,531
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 343 Times in 312 Posts
    Rep Power
    3901875
    Come on folks - we're being silly.
    A bass (/beɪs/ BAYSS) is a type of classical male singing voice and has the lowest vocal range of all voice types. According to The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, a bass is typically classified as having a vocal range extending from around the second E below middle C to the E above middle C (i.e., E2–E4).
    We don't worry about pianos at the bass end do we? They're lower than a voice. I really think we're making the proverbial mountain/molehill I=out of this one. Any decent condenser will record bass vocal range, and Lee Marvin managed to get in the charts with his voice, that recorded fine, but also reproduced fine on quite average systems. Willard White also recorded well, in contemporary recordings, and of course history has plenty of ancient recordings of bass singers.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    northampton uk home of Dr Who and Blackstar Amps!
    Posts
    9,741
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 648 Times in 612 Posts
    Rep Power
    9256934
    To inject a little experimental "skyence" here?

    Attached is a spectrum of a clip from the YT vid the OP mentioned, a truly awful recording.

    But you can see that most of the energy (first 30 secs or so) is around 100Hz, bit of a lower blip around 50Hz and a wee bump around 40Hz on the right hand channel.

    The odd thing is that singer responsible for the bass notes is on the right but his sound comes out of my left can! The sound also does NOT move with him.

    But, as I say, crap recording.

    Dave.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails spectrum-bass-voice-png  

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Bass Frequency response adjustments
    By Bruthish in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 05-14-2018, 17:30
  2. Bass vs speaker's low frequency response limits
    By Pykon in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-30-2009, 03:29
  3. MXL V67 Frequency Response
    By countrylac in forum Microphones
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-06-2005, 17:33
  4. Frequency Response Q
    By D. Parting in forum Microphones
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-30-2004, 18:28
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-08-2001, 14:00

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •