Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 57

Thread: Go-to Mic for Voice Over work

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 43 Times in 38 Posts
    Rep Power
    420904
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Quote Originally Posted by 7string View Post
    In response to an email that I sent, Robert Clotworthy (narrator for Ancient Aliens, The Curse Of Oak Island and SO much more!) said:

    "I use a Sennheiser 416 for most auditions as it is the industry standard and the mic most likely to be used at a session. For narration or animation I use the Neuman U87. I run them both through an Avalon 737 pre amp."

    I'm retired now but I use the SM7b with a Cloudlifter to voice documentaries, television/radio commercials/PSA's and you name it. Always worked wonderfully.
    I'm working on a documentary called "The Road to Poverty." I plan to pick up both the U87 and the Avalon 737.


  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 43 Times in 38 Posts
    Rep Power
    420904
    I'm with the anti-condenser crowd. Before I invest serious cash in a LDC for voiceover work, I'm measuring my noise floor. I think anyone who took the time to measure and look would probably be unhappy--at least in the standard urban/suburban home studio.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas USA
    Posts
    2,118
    Thanks
    185
    Thanked 396 Times in 360 Posts
    Rep Power
    2298480
    There was a thread around here not too long ago started by a VO guy (IIRC) that had used the RE-20 forever and thought it was fine, basically until someone gave him an old condenser (Neumann?). He put the EV away once he got it set up. It really depends on your voice, honestly. I don't see how anyone can say "you have to use this mic" for X or Y.
    "... I know in the mornin' that it's gonna be good
    when I stick out my elbows and they don't bump wood." - Bill Kirchen

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    West of Cowtown, Texas
    Posts
    414
    Thanks
    90
    Thanked 26 Times in 21 Posts
    Rep Power
    1739924
    Quote Originally Posted by dwillis45 View Post
    I'm working on a documentary called "The Road to Poverty." I plan to pick up both the U87 and the Avalon 737.

    I received the same audition. But was not selected because I do not have that gear. Staying solvent with my RE20 (Cloudlifter)> Symetrix 528e> Audient iD22> PC
    Dale

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
    Rep Power
    224045

    Studio mic, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Willett View Post
    Yes and no - you can work very well at home with a mic. like the M 930 (or U87, TLM 102/3, etc.) and a duvet hung over a mic. stand.
    I've done a LOT of that over the years! But I wonder how many "tricks" this fellow knows. I wonder if he can rent something first?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 43 Times in 38 Posts
    Rep Power
    420904
    If you switch back and forth between a mic like the SM7b and a LDC, the difference is immediately clear. That difference could easily lead you to believe that the LDC is of greater quality. You hear more and the sound is quite a bit more open. The main reason is polar pattern, room noise, and sound rejection. The SM7b is not a poor quality mic. It merely sounds different because it rejects ambient room noise. So the choice really comes down to how well isolated or how well treated your room might be.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 43 Times in 38 Posts
    Rep Power
    420904
    I should also say that this works both ways. If you are use to recording vocals in a mix with an LCD and you switch to a mic like the SM7b, be prepared for some frustration. It just doesn't sound as open and you may have to work with it for a while before you get the hang of the sound. I say this because the mic has a long-standing reputation and it's still available for a bargain price. As a result, a lot of people switch to the SM7b out of curiosity or because they've heard the hype about Michael Jackson (Thriller) or Eddie Vedder.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Rep Power
    2151
    Quote Originally Posted by rob aylestone View Post
    I'm an old sceptic, and when I cannot hear something, and see specifications that while accurate (sometimes) are often very misleading. If you get your phone and run a sound app, nowhere I can go with it is remotely silent - the noise floor on an apple is way, way down on maximum level - and once it drops below what you can hear, what's the point in chasing specs. Quite a few condensers have a reduced response as the supply voltage drops. AKG, for instance specify 48V phantom, but the also give a range of voltages for some of their mics that use a different polarising system - they might work down to below 12V, but their dynamic range is more limited. I don't think many people ever notice. Voice overs rarely have quiet rooms because of the scripts. How often do you hear paper rustles.
    Rob I agree with all you say but two points.

    A monitor screen and wireless mouse to the pc outside the sound room/boothe is used a lot instead of lots of pages and scripts. The odd bit of paper yes.

    Also when you have just spent gazillions on a new microphone. The last thing you want to hear is a hum/hiss and the decibel bar half way up the scale when you arent making a sound. The later actually happened to us until I swapped the cheap mic lead with plastic plug I had just plugged in as I excitedly opened our new mic box. A quick swap to a good lead (as prescribed by you) and problem solved.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    EV RE20 - standard in the broadcast field forever.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Fremantle, Australia
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,930
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 220 Times in 202 Posts
    Rep Power
    11804435
    Funny I don't do a lot of voiceover work, but I have had 2 clients in the last 2 weeks. The first one came in and I had a CAD Tron 8000 valve mic set up for a vocal session the day before, so I thought lets try it on the voice over. I would never have usually selected this mic but you know what, it sounded great. I asked the film producer who was in the control room what they thought and they said, "Thats exactly how the person sounds", can't get any better than that. So I used it on the second session and it worked well again.

    The point is that a good quality mic of any description and a good speaking person will sound good.

    Alan.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. what is voice over work?
    By sjaguar13 in forum Newbies
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 06-06-2019, 02:59
  2. Question in regards to Voice-Over work.
    By ShadowKingpin in forum The Rack
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-25-2014, 20:05
  3. Do I have a decent voice? What should I work on?
    By Greykitkat36 in forum Vocal Technique & Processing
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-26-2011, 11:32
  4. Voice Over Work
    By ez_willis in forum Vocal Technique & Processing
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 02-17-2010, 15:11
  5. voice over work
    By brendandwyer in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-18-2006, 15:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •