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Thread: Famous Dynamics Studio Use?

  1. #1
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    Famous Dynamics Studio Use?

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    First post in like a million years. I know.

    So this is intended as a bit of banter. I'm aware that dynamic mics can, and do end up being used to record not just vocals, but the lead vocals in studio. Some examples I can think of being U2, Michael Jackson, I want to say Pearl Jam has used an SM7 of some kind, and I think I've seen footage of Filter using an RE20. I've read mentions of Bjork as well. While these artists might not be anywhere near my favorites, I'm guessing there's other examples of this. Anyone know any? Bonus if it includes Electro Voice, just because I really like that brand. Lol.

    A tangent of this would also be: what about Hi-Z dynamics?
    I scored a piece of vintage kit that was sold as tested, good. I need to get a cable, but it's an old EV 950 Cardax. Anyone famous for recording using high impedance? I'm gonna use it in some fashion anyway, even if for cool factor and home karaoke. But Google doesn't turn up much data.

    Just something kinda fun to muse over. I'm gonna keep trying different key word searches... but figured some folks might have some neat stories to spread around.

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    I read somewhere that the drums on Hall & Oates' Sara Smile were recorded with SM57s.

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    everyone before a certain date probably recorded with a high impedance mic at some point. Loads of Shure 545 and 565 dynamics were dual impedance. everyone has forgotten the old low impedance mics (25-50Ohms) that were popular too. Plenty of Hi-Z Shures around too. The Beatles of course with Hi-z Reslo Ribbons.

    I'm not sure the impedance is very important is it? When here we were running WEM PAs with 100W output and Hi-Z inputs we thought they were great with a couple of 4 x 12" columns.

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    Interesting bit regarding the Beatles.
    I don't think Hi-Z matters much as long as things are impedance matched, and your cables aren't long enough to cause degradation. I heard through music shop rumor once that the Doors recorded with high impedance.
    Largely I'm stoked to get my own seriously old school style mic. My buddy who runs karaoke has a Shure 55s that a friend of his have him... which I've sang though a lot before Covid came around. I really enjoyed it, but also like a LOT of that era's music.

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    The impedance does not matter in any artistic sense. How many studio musicians would even care what mic is put out? They might occasionally be surprised, but it’s not their role. As for music shop rumours, there best appreciated, laughed at and forgotten. The fact that somebody thinks it makes a difference sums it up. Of course matching is very important, so hi-z into the right input is critical, but when high impedance mics were popular, so were the correct inputs. I can only think of one mic that survived only in high impedance designs - harmonica mics. These sound absolutely horrible plugged into mic inputs!

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    I can get that. Not everyone who performs music gets into the gear side of it, in regards to recording. I imagine that's even more true of professionals. Some of the original question comes from listening to some older artists, and liking that "vintage sound. "

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    Having long cables on a hi-z mics will roll off the highs pretty dramatically. For local bands, that was rarely a concern since the PAs were usually a short distance from the mics. Nobody I knew in the 60s had a 50ft snake with a mixing board in the back for gigs at the local high school dances. Plop your Shure VocalMaster 300, Kustom 100 or Bogen Challenger on the front of the stage, plug the mics into the 1/4" jacks and rock out!

    There were a lot of old recordings that were made with mics like the Shure 55s. The "vintage sound" of those mics isn't from the impedence, its from the limited response. Those things drop off 10dB or more by 12k. They have peaks around 4-5k.

    This was really common for ribbon and dynamic mics from the 40s and 50s. RCA ribbons used for a lot of big names have peaks around 5k, and roll off by 10 or more dB by the time they get to 15k. Check out the response curves for old EV V series ribbons and RCA ribbons like the type 77, model 44. i don't think any of them even show responses over 15K.

    A lot of mics today have presence peaks from 7 to 12k, which it the exact opposite of the old mics.

    Add that to the limitations of old records (you don't think those old ceramic cartridges in your Philco stereo did 20-20000, do you?) That's the vintage sound that so many of us grew up listening to in the living room.

    Now you have people trying to do 384k digital recordings that have 100kHz bandwidth, condenser mics that are +5dB at 12K and trying to get a vintage sound. That's like trying to build a 50s Chevy pickup out of carbon fiber, titanium and a turbo 4 cylinder engine.

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    I just happen to be watching the Linda Ronstadt Live In Hollywood concert on PBS, which was put out on both video and on an album. The concert was in 1980, and all the vocal mics are the Shure Unidyne iV 548. She sounds fantastic! I can't tell what type of mics they have on the drums, its in low resolution.

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