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Thread: buying a real piano...

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    buying a real piano...

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    I'm looking forward to buying a piano. I'll have to do with an upright, due to placing and money limits *sigh*, but it's still better than the digital monster.

    So, what specific points do I have to look at? Anyone got an idea? I found some websites on this, with a few tricks like seeing how long a certain note sustains etc...

    If you know tricks... Go ahead.

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    Im no pro........But,

    You might want to take someone along who knows about wood rot and the visual inspection of wood etc...

    Strings and hammers and other components are replacable, but If the wood is rotted, your F*cked!
    (Unless you want to pay an arm and a leg for restoration..)

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    uhm

    for the price, yamaha's are most worth it, and steinway's have great sound too.

    Just like what you like, feel, sound, easy(ness). Make sure the pedals work along with all the keys and all before buying =P of course.
    peace out, musician

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    Kawai make some nice pianos too.

    cheers
    john

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    I've played a couple of yamaha's. The U3 and the V-series (Vienna)... I like them both. U3 sounded a little more open, but less warm. But that is out of my pricerange... The V-series might be the way to go. I really liked the touch of the yamaha's.

    I liked the sound of the petrof pianos. They are also a little cheaper than the yamaha's, but there touch is heavy, which is a big nono for this weak-wristed fella... The 131 has got renner-action, maybe it has a lighter touch... We'll see tomorrow...

    Steinway is probably even more out of my budget as the yamaha's. But I will check 'em. Haven't seen any kawai's but that will change soon too...

    Tomorrow I'm going to Brussels, to one of the biggest piano stores in Belgium... Fun day out. But probably quite expensive. Hope it's worth it.

    Then I'll probably try to arrange meetings with some more local piano dealers. More of the second hand/technician dealers... See what they can offer. I should have a good idea of what a piano should sound like by then....

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    I used to sell pianos and they have pretty much gone the same way as all other instruments when it comes to manufacturing.

    The vast majority of pianos are built by Young Chang(sp?), Sammick and Daiwoo. The other companies have them built to spec and slap their name on it. I havent really looked at the industry in about 10yrs but at that time the Young Changs were the best built.

    If you want a true quality instrument you will need to get a Steinway, Bechstein, Schimmel or one of the other hand built pianos. They use better wood, construction, and usually have a Renner action or similar quality. A cheap action will limit your ability to play with any subtlety or dynamics.

    For a Korean studio upright with around 50" strings (about the same length as a baby grand) you will spend around 5-7k US. For a hand made you can spend around 8-15k US. Those were the prices in the early 90's and may have risen since then.

    I would strongly reccomend Schimmel if they are still around. They are not as well known and are a little cheaper but they have a very clear and delicate tone. Some people prefer the heavy sound of a Bechstein or Steinway but that is up to you.

    Look closely at the quality of the Harp and the soundboard and the general fit of all the pieces. You can definately see a big difference between a quality piano and a cheap korean one.

    How much do you want to spend? Are you buying new or used? I can give you some more tips if you like. If you are not going to get a hand made piano and record in a good room I would reccomend going with a good digital for best recording results.

    Cheap pianos are only good for learning and practicing, not recording.

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    Roel, you wanna buy mine? I have a spinet, good condition, just needs tuning. I use it when I teach, but I dont record with it. I am sure the shipping will only be about 9 million dollars, its a heavy motha.
    You sure a young guy like you wants a piano? There a pain in the ass to move...

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    Originally posted by DavidK

    You sure a young guy like you wants a piano? There a pain in the ass to move...
    I can second that! I have this piano here:
    http://www.steinway.com/images/boston/gp_218.jpg
    and umm...its upstairs!
    [SIZE=3][COLOR=RoyalBlue][FONT=Garamond][b][i]"Nobody digs ya music, butcha self"[/i][/FONT][/COLOR][/b][/SIZE]

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    Yes, thanks David, I was thinking about that too, but I still prefer it over a mandolin.

    TexRoadKill, I have an A90 that I use for recording. I mainly need a piano because I'm going to study music theory (composition lateron) next year, and piano is a part of that... So it's not really for recording. I'm currently praciticing on the A90 and I really feel lost when I play a real piano... It's noisy, with all these real strings etc...

    I played on some Young Changs and didn't really like them. The tone seemed rather shattered. Not really a dense solid tone. And it really lacked warmth. Maybe they have more expensive series too?

    I was thinking of spending about 5000$ max. I still need to have money left to pay my studies next year. And I really don't know if I will buy new or second hand. Today I'm going to that big piano store, see what the price is for a good piano, and what is in my reach, and then I'll check the second hand market, compare and see if the pricedifference is worth it... I read somewhere on the net that the prices don't really decrease alot.

    So, I'm on a budget, and need a piano that is good for practicing, on a decent level. Suggestions?

    Thanks!

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    There's a book called "The Piano Book". I forget who wrote it, but it lists EVERY piano EVER made. All the makes, all the models. It explains the querks each model has, how much they should cost, when they were made, and what to expect from both new and used pianos. If you're going to buy a used piano, get it from a dealer. I wouldn't buy a piano from an individual, unless I could take a tuner or technician along with me. Most pianos do appreciate over time, but not all, and it depends on how well they were cared for. Expect on having to have the piano tuned at least twice a year; this should be considered a minimum.


    I'd stay away from "Young Chang" pianos as well. I had a Young Chang grand, and although it had a nice warm tone to it, it was very noisey. Young Chang makes an OK entry level piano, but if you're going after an upright, I'd consider a Baldwin Acrosonic. This was my first piano, and I played the heck out of it! Consider also, Yamaha or Boston Uprights. Stay away from Spinnets, and anything Korean made!
    [SIZE=3][COLOR=RoyalBlue][FONT=Garamond][b][i]"Nobody digs ya music, butcha self"[/i][/FONT][/COLOR][/b][/SIZE]

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