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Thread: Univox Amp - anyone?

  1. #1
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    Univox Amp - anyone?

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    I just picked up an old solid state Univox amp for $20 - after a little research, it may be a U65 (vintage 1971, solid state. It does not power up. I unscrewed the fuse cap and there is no fuse. The lable on the amp indicates 0.3A - which I think is a basic 1 amp fuse.

    I'm hopeful a new fuse will allow me to fire it up - and would like to use the right type of fuse. If I can get it fired up, it may have a little trade value ...... if nothing else, I think Univox used higher end Jenson speakers - so at least the 12" speaker my be worth $20.

    I'm a drummer and rather ignorant about guitar amps. Does 0.3A indicate a certain type of fuse??? I appreciate any insight anyone can offer.

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    If the label says 0.3A, that means a 0.3 amp fuse.

    However, a picture of the label and fuse holder would be handy.

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    If you have a room with a dimmer switch hooked to an outlet, you should use it.
    To fire that up after however many years with no power or not being used.... could be you will fry the guts before getting any sound out of it.
    It needs to be powered up slowly so you dont ruin it.
    If you can't do that, you will risk a toasted amp that is not even worth your $20.
    You can make a small 'VARIAC' or variable voltage unit from a house dimmer switch and an outlet.
    Plug the dimmer into a wall outlet, and your amp into the dimmer switch outlet you have wired to it, then bring up the voltage slowly, and it will be less likely to hurt the amp.
    S

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    Quote Originally Posted by weakenduser View Post
    If you have a room with a dimmer switch hooked to an outlet, you should use it.
    To fire that up after however many years with no power or not being used.... could be you will fry the guts before getting any sound out of it.
    It needs to be powered up slowly so you dont ruin it.
    If you can't do that, you will risk a toasted amp that is not even worth your $20.
    You can make a small 'VARIAC' or variable voltage unit from a house dimmer switch and an outlet.
    Plug the dimmer into a wall outlet, and your amp into the dimmer switch outlet you have wired to it, then bring up the voltage slowly, and it will be less likely to hurt the amp.
    S
    Admittedly I'm no electrical or electronic expert, but this sounds like a really bad idea to me. Someone correct me if I'm wrong but, in a given circuit, applying lower than required voltage would cause the current to go higher than normal for a given load. I may be nuts and will accept it if you tell me so, but this just sounds like a bad idea.

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    If the amp was made for use on this side of the Atlantic ocean, the very first components connected to the other end of the power cord are designed and arranged to "safely" handle approximately 110v to 120v. If one or more of these components "fail", the circuitry will simply blow a fuse. So, if you really want to "test" it, I say--dust it off, plug it in and turn it ON. Except for some very rare "digital" equipment, I can't think of a reason why less voltage would harm an amp. The amount of "current" that the amp uses is largely dependent upon the Output of Watts as you crank the Gain/Vol/Master Vol./etc.
    [IMG]SG1.jpg[/IMG]http://www.soundclick.com/jimssondean http://www.soundclick.com/jimssondean

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    If ANY old electronics has not been powered up in like 20 years, plugging it in and turning it on can fry parts....
    After that long, gravity will cause oils and waxes ,which were used in some old amp capacitors
    they could fail and send damaging voltages to other parts of the amp.
    Nice little puff of smoke, and threr goes the output tranny, or something like that....
    Better to power it up slowly and as it gets power the re-conditioning of the caps will happen, and the amp might be OK after that...
    Old electronics that have not been plugged in will last longer if care and attention is paid to the parts inside....
    Truth, and a habit any person restoring old gear can attest to.
    Most of that is done using a Variac.... which my description of a dimmer switch, is very much like.
    And when you have done this type of thing for 40 plus years, then you can express your disbelief....

    S

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