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Thread: Tuning to "D"

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    Hi, I've recently taken to tuning my guitar entirely in "D" (D-G-C-A-D) because I I get a lot of voicings I really like that work better with my vocal range than the standard "E" tuning... Now, I use light-top heavy-bottom strings (.10-.52) and find that since I've been down-tuning, they don't stay in tune worth a darn. Do I just have to re-intonate my guitar, or should I change string gauge?

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    D-G-C-A-D ??? DGCAD what?
    Is that a Banjo?
    BTW my favorite D tuning is: (lo to hi)
    DADGBE

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    No, it's not a banjo! I've just tuned every string down a whole step.

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    Question

    What'd you do with the "G" string? Excuse me for asking. Maybe I don't want to know...

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    Oops! I meant D-G-C-F-A-D. Silly me...

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    Cool

    Leave it to the Doc...*GRIN*
    Anyway, I tune to all sorts of tunings. Some of mine aren't even tunings, I just twist the pegs til it sounds good. It's good ear training...., but have your allen wrench on hand!!
    What is happening when you detune is the neck moves, changing your intonation and action and other stuff. Some guitars are real sensitive to this like my '68 strat. You can see the neck move when you tune it! Others have enough wood in the neck that they just don't give a darn. So, if you want your guitar to stay in this tuning then you have to set it up for playing in 'd' or you'll have to get another guitar. One that doesn't have a real sensitive neck (those guitars usually have a neck like a baseball bat sawn in half.) Good luck!

    Viking_______________________________________

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    Thanks a lot man! I will definetely re-intonate my guitar, and look into maybe getting some better tuning pegs. Much appreciated!

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    Are you playing a guitar with a tremolo-type bridge (e.g. strat). Those can be very susceptible to instability due to differing string pressures--e.g. alternative tunings, different string guages. My solution to an unstable bridge was block it. There's a good discussion about this here:
    http://www.harmony-central.com/Guita...er_tremolo.txt

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