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Thread: Set-neck vs bolt-on neck

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    What is the advantage of having a guitar with a set-neck vs a bolt-on neck?

    I want to buy a Schecter C-7 guitar, which has a bolt-on neck, but there's also the slightly more expensive C-7 Plus which has a set-neck. Is it worth it to shell out the extra dough? And what is the difference? I mean, does it sound different? Is it more solid?

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    More sustain is the advantage. The junction of the neck and the guitar is tighter-for lack of a better word, therefore sound resonates between the two more freely.

    The disadvantage would be that if the neck ever got really out of whack, it's much harder to adjust or to swap it out.

    dmc

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    The set-neck model is 150$ more, is it worth it?

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    Lightbulb

    I'd say play'em both through *your* amp and decide after that.

    I just bought a set-neck bass that was used and a little beat-up vs. one that was all shiny and new, but had a bolt on neck. To my ears, the set-neck sounded better and it has infinite sustain.

    Let your ears be the judge.

    BTW: Les Pauls have set necks which greatly contributes to their characteristic tone.

    dmc

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    Question

    What about "neck-thru-body", what does that mean?

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    Set-neck and neck-thru-body are interchangeable terms....ironically enough.

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    What type of pick ups are you going to have?
    Single coil or humbuckers? The neck attachment will make a significant and noticeable difference to the overall sound you are looking for.

    foo

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    I will probably get a guitar with two humbuckers, if not, one humbucker in bridge position, and two single coils (center and neck, like a fat strat)

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    Cool

    If the 'Strat' portion of the sound is real important to you, then get a bolt-on neck. In '82 a friend had two guitars built - both had neck-through body construction - I had one made with a bolt-on neck. Same builder, similar pickups, same bridge etc.

    We both went the two humbuckers with a coil tap and a single coil between them route. When used in single coil mode, mine really sounded a lot like my Strat - his had a lot more middle, but didn't have that 'jangle'

    foo

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    Cool

    Actually, there's a difference between set necks and neck-through-body design. In a set neck guitar, the neck is a separate component which is permanently glued to the body, but the neck itself stops at the body. In neck-through-body guitars, the wood that the neck is carved from continues as one solid piece all the way down to the bottom of the guitar, and then two pieces of wood are glued to either side of the "neck" to make up the rest of the body. Hence the term "neck through body" as the neck more or less goes clear down through the body of the guitar.

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