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Thread: L.R. Baggs Para Acoustic D.I.

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    I bought this LR Baggs Para Acoustic D.I. used for 100 bucks and the thing is great. It really helps me get a better acoustic sound than just the mic through another preamp that I am currently using(actually the Pod preamp)The question is, I can't seem to figure out how to use the notch filter....it doesn't seem to make much difference when I crank it full up or full down, Also, the notch filter points to another nob with the letters "A, D, G, B" around it. I can't figure this one out either ......I wonder what these letters mean because I don't really hear any difference when I turn this nob either.
    Does any one out there know their way around their "Bagg"?

    [This message has been edited by Supersonic (edited 04-29-2000).]

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    Notch filters are very often overrated and not needed. They are desigend to cut down on feedback by cutting certain frequencies and such, unless you are playing at high volumes, they usually are not needed. The ones on the Baggs stuff are usually pretty decent. I know Fender puts one on their Acousisonic Jr. Amp and it works great when playing above 6, but before that it doesn't change the sound or do really anything. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful...
    mike

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    Where a notch filter really helps is at a bar bash where everybody gets undisciplined about volume, everyone is turned up WAY too loud, and the stage volume gets painful. You know, a typical Tuesday night.

    An acoustic instrument is sensitive to stage volume and will resonate at it's own favorite frequency to that same frequency when encountered on the stage. Sometimes soundhole plugs will help, but when the problem is really bad, you can literally feel the guitar trying to pull itself apart in your hands. Instant and wild feedback.

    A notch filter will allow you to cut the frequency (using a very narrow EQ band) at which the guitar overresonates to keep that from happening. You can sweep the frequency and adjust the amount to be cut.

    If you can't tell the difference, it means that you're being reasonable with the instrument in the first place. Kind of like airbags; you don't test them on a regular basis...

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    I use the para di as well and love it. The four letters represent frequency bands. I'm at work right now, but when I get home I will post what they are for you. When you use the notch, you are cutting out a narrow frequency band so it definitely makes a difference in your sound but it is subtle. Also another thing worth mentioning. If you open up the box, there is a small screw on the inside which is basically a master gain pot. The para di is setup for their LB6 pickup but so you may get better results if you adjust this. If you have a strong active pickup you will probably need to cut it down some. You will need a small screwdriver to adjust it, like the ones in eyeglass repair kits. Lastly if you do any bass recording, I have heard the para di does a wonderful job with this as well if you tweak the knobs some. Haven't tried it myself but the guy who sets up my guitars says it works great.

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    Okay, straight from the owner's manual:

    "Notch Control (98 to 247 Hz) Designed primarily to help with feedback problems, i.e. if a particualr string is starting to "go off" or the guitar is "booming", you can use the notch to cut the problem frequency. The tune knob is marked in notes of the scale to help find the frequency. Try boosting the notch control (full clockwise) and sweeping the tune knob until the feedback is at its worst, then turning back toward "cut" (counterclockwise). Cut only enough to kill the feedback. The Notch Control can also be used as an EQ knob. A slight cut between "D" and "B" (around 200 Hz) can clarify a boomy or muddy tone, and light boosts in this range will give a thin sounding guitar more body and a more acoustic sound.

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