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Thread: bass blister

  1. #1
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    I am a guitar player teaching myself how to play slap bass, but I am constantly getting a large blister on my "pop" finger. I have to stop practicing for days at a time, and after one hour of playing again, theres the blister. I realize I am going to get blisters, but thought I would have a callass by know(one month) Am I doing something wrong? How long does it take to get a good callass?

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    Blisters are a pain..literally..When I use a "Slap and pop" technique I use my ring finger on my right hand for the "pop" part, but I use the fingernail more than the fingertip to pluck the string....This may not work for extended periods of time, but I only ever use it sparingly..Good luck with the callouses..going from Guitar strings to Bass strings is hard work.

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    Part of playing bass is getting hurt... lol. I've been playing bass for 13 years, and if I ever go for a few weeks without playing my fingers will hurt when I pick it up again. I alternate between my index and midle finger when using a slap technique. Throw the ring finger in there like Spir@l mentioned and you have three times the amount of playing time before your blisters get so bad you can't play. I tried putting tape on my fingers a few times, and it helped with the blisters. I just didn't get the same feeling when popping the strings and so quit doing that. This is probably not what you want to hear, but I just dealt with the pain until my fingers got toughened up enough where I could at least continue playing. I don't think you are doing anything wrong, it just takes years really to get major callases going. Plus, you will build up some hand strength and better callases for your guitar playing. Playing bass first really helped me out when I moved to guitar.

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    one mistake that a lot of bassists (or whoever) make is popping the blister...you need to let the blister stay there so that a callous can form...the bit about using all of your fingers is a really good idea, so long as everything you do is consistent...

    and if you really feel the need to pop the blister, wait about a week or so before doing it...the skin underneath will be real tender, but healed...and futhermore while you're waiting you can always play with a pick hehehe

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    I have blisters on me fingers!

    Playing bass is definitely playing with pain.
    I have been playing for 25 years and it has become a fact of life. Maybe I just like it.

    The callases will come in time and once you have them they will never truly go away. Just give it time and like the others have said use alternate fingers until they come.

    Long Live Stanley Clarke!!!

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    The function of that blister is to keep you from get hurt any further, however, something you should keep in mind in 'slap & pop' is that you have to get the sound right before you do the practise, if you dont get the pop sound in your mind out of your amp, you tends to 'pop' harder and harder, and get larger and larger blister.

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    Angus is right. With the right equipment, it doesn't take much effort to "pop". Use the amp for volume, not your attack. Watch Marcus Miller play and you'll see what I mean. His playing is almost effortless.

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