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Thread: Where have all the acoustic drums gone ?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by raybbj View Post
    For me it's space. I live in Vancouver where you can't buy a house for less than $1.3M. If I had a house, I would always record acoustic drums. I desperately miss playing and recording acoustic drums sooooooooo bad!!! Until I win the lottery, it's V-Drums for me.
    That I do understand. We sold the house 12 years ago and now live in a small apartment. When the house was sold I used the left over money after buying the apartment to put a deposit on a small factory unit and convert to a studio and warehouse for the live gear / band gear. Oh and my Man Cave, LOL.

    I do sometimes record drums for people with home studios, they take the files and then use them at home.

    Alan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by witzendoz View Post
    The last album I recorded with drum samples I played and recorded real cymbal parts. That made a huge difference.
    That's what ultimately did it for me. The cymbals. Everything else, I think I could have just about lived with, even if initially reluctantly. I could have worked a way around the pad hits coming out in the cymbal mics. I bought a 'brain' {the TD10, I think it was} that had 8 outputs so I probably could have gotten around the tom sounds. I bought a mesh head snare that was meant to be able to do rimshots. But the hi hat and cymbals never sounded good no matter what I did. I did ponder on whether I could just record real cymbals but in the end I noted that that often, where others paddled, I dived deep, even to my own detriment at times. So it was back to a whole kit.
    The funny thing is, I love the idea of an electric drumkit. It falls in line with everything I believe in about the freedom and experimentation that has so often reared its head in the recording of music. Also ironically, even when I went back to an acoustic kit, sometimes I use an electric kick. That was because there was a time when I found that I was getting so much bleed through the kick mic when one drummer in particular played. I was also experimenting with a suitcase as a kick.
    Quote Originally Posted by witzendoz View Post

    I think the absence of real drums is that everyone wants perfect drum sounds and are too lazy to learn how to record real drums. I think that the great thing about recording real drums is they don't all sound the same.
    It's interesting that you mention perfect drum sounds. I just don't know what a perfect drum sound is. I guess I'm a bit of a Philistine in that regard. I have long listened to a wide range of music and there have been so many different drum sounds. As long as it sounds like drums to me, I'm up and running. I don't ever recall not liking a particular drum sound. Or for that matter, liking one. I do like particular snare sounds and even some bass drum sounds but not any overall drum sound. I'd always tend to be moved firstly by the song, then what the drummer was doing. The sonics only came into it in an offhand way. And they all sound so different. Recently I've been listening to those deconstructions of Beatle songs on YouTube where you hear what's on an individual track. On some, the drums on their own sound great but not necessarily in the song. And some of the ones that don't sound all that on their own feel wonderful in the songs. But I realize that it's because I love the songs first and foremost.
    It's arguable whether I do know how to record a kit but right from when I first started recording mine and my drummer mate's jams back in '82, starting from trial and error, I've got to that point where I'm happy with what I get. No one else might be but I am !

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    Quote Originally Posted by grimtraveller View Post
    The funny thing is, I love the idea of an electric drumkit. It falls in line with everything I believe in about the freedom and experimentation that has so often reared its head in the recording of music. Also ironically, even when I went back to an acoustic kit, sometimes I use an electric kick.
    Shoot. I wish I could remember the name of the system. MIA is one of the endorsers of it, but there's this system where you add a variety of triggers to an acoustic set, and they're velocity/location sensitive so they can trigger different samples based on how you play the physical drum itself.

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    Basically, the way I use it is to connect the electric kick to the brain and just use one of the outs from the brain module straight into the DAW onto its own track. Whoever is playing drums uses a proper kick drum pedal so it's all done in real time. When I've used the kick that way, in the overheads you can hear the thump of the pedal against the surface of the kick. Then when mixing, just raise or lower the volume on the kick track depending on what is going on in the song.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grimtraveller View Post
    That's what ultimately did it for me. The cymbals. Everything else, I think I could have just about lived with, even if initially reluctantly. I could have worked a way around the pad hits coming out in the cymbal mics. I bought a 'brain' {the TD10, I think it was} that had 8 outputs so I probably could have gotten around the tom sounds. I bought a mesh head snare that was meant to be able to do rimshots. But the hi hat and cymbals never sounded good no matter what I did. I did ponder on whether I could just record real cymbals but in the end I noted that that often, where others paddled, I dived deep, even to my own detriment at times. So it was back to a whole kit.
    The funny thing is, I love the idea of an electric drumkit. It falls in line with everything I believe in about the freedom and experimentation that has so often reared its head in the recording of music. Also ironically, even when I went back to an acoustic kit, sometimes I use an electric kick. That was because there was a time when I found that I was getting so much bleed through the kick mic when one drummer in particular played. I was also experimenting with a suitcase as a kick.
    It's interesting that you mention perfect drum sounds. I just don't know what a perfect drum sound is. I guess I'm a bit of a Philistine in that regard. I have long listened to a wide range of music and there have been so many different drum sounds. As long as it sounds like drums to me, I'm up and running. I don't ever recall not liking a particular drum sound. Or for that matter, liking one. I do like particular snare sounds and even some bass drum sounds but not any overall drum sound. I'd always tend to be moved firstly by the song, then what the drummer was doing. The sonics only came into it in an offhand way. And they all sound so different. Recently I've been listening to those deconstructions of Beatle songs on YouTube where you hear what's on an individual track. On some, the drums on their own sound great but not necessarily in the song. And some of the ones that don't sound all that on their own feel wonderful in the songs. But I realize that it's because I love the songs first and foremost.
    It's arguable whether I do know how to record a kit but right from when I first started recording mine and my drummer mate's jams back in '82, starting from trial and error, I've got to that point where I'm happy with what I get. No one else might be but I am !
    I think this quote from Grimtravellar could easily be a topic on this forum alone. Who's to say "what is the perfect drum sound or guitar sound? So many of the recordings I grew up with and loved had far from perfect 'anything' except passion and effort."
    The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side - Hunter S. Thompson

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    There is no 'perfect drum sound' that fit's all. No guitar tone that is perfect for every song...

    I am more of a 'purist' of sort when it comes to drums and guitar tone, even though I work mostly with heavy types of music, there is also the country or acoustic stuff that still needs the same IMO. But I also will add samples to get the desired drum tone.

    Granted, I do have a studio that allows me the ability to have a moderately adequate space for a drum recording room. And I have been lucky enough to be able to spend the money on acoustic treatment in it, to make it worthy.

    I suppose what I am saying is that whatever works for anyone in any situation or budget, is what you have to work with. Programmed drums can work very well for most projects.

    It is always different for each musician or project. It would be boring if it were all the same...
    PC Win7-64-24G i7-4790k/Cubase 9 Pro 64-bit/2-Steinberg UR824's/ADAM A7x/Event TR8/SS Trigger Plat Deluxe/Melodyne 4 Studio/Other things that don't mean anything if a client shows up not knowing what it wants.

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