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Thread: If you were to learn to play drums all over again

  1. #1
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    If you were to learn to play drums all over again

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    how would you teach someone to learn drums, knowing what you know now?

    I am trying to teach myself, and I have a pretty good routine going for when I practice. I spend an equal amount of time on

    -snare roll
    -tom/kick triplets (bonham thing, i hope you know what i mean)
    -kick drum speed, double kicks (using single kick pedal) (I usually play a funk beat or something and practice this)
    -fast punk rock beats
    -swing
    -spend a small amount of time playing fills

    this is about 45-60 minutes and I noticed that every time I sit down my powers are greater. I have also spent some time playing along to CD's and mimicking fills and stuff, as well as spent some time just playing to a metronome.

    So far, so good, but what other stuff am I missing?? (A lot, I'm sure) If you could list in order what you would try to accomplish. A lot of people say they just play until they find something they can't do, then practice until they can do it. what are those things? what order would you learn them in ? show me a road map....

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    Lots of new drummers I hear seem to only have one basic beat structure working for them. They get creative with their fills, but the foundation feels repetitive through a catalog of songs.

    If I were teaching, I think I'd have them follow a (I'm having serious dejavu right now. I seem to remember getting my ass kicked for giving this very same advice ).

    Anyway, I'd have a new player follow a variety of different material, trying to emulate the different beat patterns. You can practice fills all day long, and that's cool, but you don't wanna become mentaly cast into a narrow field of comfort.
    Cheeseburgers Rock!

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    I think besides what you mentioned, you (me and everyone) can really benefit from playing to a click both slow AND fast and practice simple beats, then move up to subdivided beats and fills as well as syncopations but keeping it in time with the metronome.
    It has helped me not speed through turn arounds and fills.
    Tom Menikos
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    Thumbs up

    I have bought the Rock Drumming System with Mike Michalkow teaching. It was a good deal and a good investment. You can also download a DVD by Derek Roddy (Eternal Hate) He goes in depth on warm ups and things. Awesome video. You can download it from UTorrent or go to his site
    http://www.derekroddy.com/ If I had it to do over again I would have practice more when I first started playing and bought a Tama Iron Cobra much sooner then I did. Good luck man. PM me if your interested in the DVD's I have. I can burn any DVD with a converter I bought a few years ago that is now almost impossible to find.

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    As a player for almst 50 years who was mostly self taught...but then spent a lot of time in later years trying to study and improve - If I were to offer drum teaching advice it would be:

    1. Get a good teacher....someone who can teach proper technique (posture, holding the sticks, etc.) - once poor technique is learned, it can be very difficult to unlearn and bad technique can compromise overall skill development.

    2. Learn a melodic instrument...learning to approach music with a melodic understanding can improve your ability to properly complement a song (and it make communicating with the other musicians in an educated manner....soooo much easier)

    3. Develop an appreciation and understanding of all musical genres - it will improve overall versitility and significantly increase the potential to find gigs when the time comes

    4. Be prepared and willing to commit a lot of time - while talent may be a gift....skill require a lot of time and effort. Accept that there will be other things that must be sacrificed to achieve a reasonable level of skill

    5. Learn rudiments.......they my seem boring and it may even seem questionable how much you really need them to keep a beat.........but you will be surprised how much you can use rudiments in complex grooves and creative fills

    6. If you are right handed....spend time developing your left hand (same with the feet). Learn to ride with the weak hand and learn to lead into fills with either hand......it will allow you to develop more interesting fills/grroves.

    7. Never stop learning. At some point a teacher will have no muore to teach you....it is then time to move on to another teacher....and then another.....

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    This is all really great stuff....thanks!! But I don't think I was very clear in my original post.... I am looking for stuff to take into my next practice... technically...

    So, for instance, if I were to teach someone lead guitar, the first thing I would have them do is chromatic exercises up and down the neck to develop picking clarity and speed, and cooridation with the fingers. Then I would teach the 5 chord positions up and down the neck. Then I would teach major, minor, and dominant scales, in all 5 positions.. Then and only then would I teach certain licks, then on to the pentatonic, etc. etc.

    Xdrummer mentioned rudiments....can you explain this more ?

    I guess I am looking to figure out what I don't know I don't know.

  7. #7
    RAMI Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Xdrummer View Post
    As a player for almst 50 years who was mostly self taught...but then spent a lot of time in later years trying to study and improve - If I were to offer drum teaching advice it would be:

    1. Get a good teacher....someone who can teach proper technique (posture, holding the sticks, etc.) - once poor technique is learned, it can be very difficult to unlearn and bad technique can compromise overall skill development.

    2. Learn a melodic instrument...learning to approach music with a melodic understanding can improve your ability to properly complement a song (and it make communicating with the other musicians in an educated manner....soooo much easier)

    3. Develop an appreciation and understanding of all musical genres - it will improve overall versitility and significantly increase the potential to find gigs when the time comes

    4. Be prepared and willing to commit a lot of time - while talent may be a gift....skill require a lot of time and effort. Accept that there will be other things that must be sacrificed to achieve a reasonable level of skill

    5. Learn rudiments.......they my seem boring and it may even seem questionable how much you really need them to keep a beat.........but you will be surprised how much you can use rudiments in complex grooves and creative fills

    6. If you are right handed....spend time developing your left hand (same with the feet). Learn to ride with the weak hand and learn to lead into fills with either hand......it will allow you to develop more interesting fills/grroves.

    7. Never stop learning. At some point a teacher will have no muore to teach you....it is then time to move on to another teacher....and then another.....
    This is a great post.

    If you're just starting out on the drums, I have a good basic drum "lesson" page for beginners on my site. It even has a practice chart and link to an online metronome, which you should always use. If you're just starting out, get a practice pad and spend way more time on that than on the kit.

    You can check it out here: www.ramirami.com/drumtips

    (You can stop the music that automatically plays by clicking in the bottom left of the screen)
    Last edited by RAMI; 10-22-2009 at 13:45.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FALKEN View Post
    Xdrummer mentioned rudiments....can you explain this more ?
    Rudiments are much like scales on a melodic instrument. Things such as single stroke rolls, double stroke rolls, para-diddles, etc. promote the ability to execute smooth stick movement. Once someone can execute a steady, even single stroke roll, they can then accent certain hits to develop dynamics, etc.

    You mentioned you worked on snare rolls. In application, that could be single stroke rolls (L-R-L-R) or double storke rolls (R-R-L-L) or even a para-diddle (R-L-R-R-L-R-L-L).

    You also mentioned working on double kick rolls (which are normally single stroke rudiments)....but learning other rudiments with the feet can really improve double kick technique.

    Another good exercise is to break up rudiments betwwen limbs.....as an example a single stroke rudiment could be executed as follows (right hand -left hand - right foot - left foot).

    If you search on line under drum rudiments....you should find drum music (which is not much diffent than guitar tab) showing all the variaous rudiments.

    You also mentioned - playing to CDs...............that is something that has developed the skills of drummers since the days of 78rpm recordings.

    But, do not underestimate the value of finding a teacher. If you develop poor habits while teaching yourself....it can be very hard to unlearn those habits.

  9. #9
    dintymoore Guest
    Thinking out loud:

    * all drumming is based on the single stroke roll

    * almost all music is based on 8 bars phrases, 4 beats to a bar

    * get your feet solid and your hands will follow. The extra great drummers, like Steve Gadd, have an extra solid kick

    * copy the greats drummers of all time, not the ones on that stupid poll they had here, but the real greats

    * study the most recorded musician in the history of music - Hal Blaine. I believe that Hal is what most people want from a drummer, yet very few have ever heard of him, although he is probably the one musician most people in the world have heard the most.

    * a good drum track should outline the form of the tune

    * don't accept good drums and cymbals, go for over the top great - it won't cost any more, it's actually often cheaper

    * don't buy new drums or cymbals - overall they suck and you're better off buying used

    * when you play, listen to yourself secondarily. You should primarily be listening to whoever has the ball at the moment - it's usually the singer or the lead instrument

    * remember that a drummer's roll 99.9999999999999% of the time is to be an accompanist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dintymoore View Post

    * don't buy new drums or cymbals - overall they suck and you're better off buying used
    .
    Stupidest point ever.

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