View Poll Results: How many tracks do you use to record your drums?

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  • 2 Tracks?

    39 8.48%
  • 3 Tracks?

    51 11.09%
  • 5 Tracks?

    67 14.57%
  • More than 5?

    303 65.87%
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Thread: How many tracks do you use to record drums?

  1. #91
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    i use as many (or few) as needed for the drums in the context of the song. some songs need everything mic'd--toms and all. some songs call for just an OH, kick, room and maybe snare.

    usually, though, i tend to default to a mono overhead (V67), a mono room mic (dragonfly), over and under snare mics (shure 545 over and mxl603 under), and 3 mics on the kick (senn 609 inside the drum right next to the beater, EV RE38 in the hole and MXL V77 in front of the resonant head). with the proper placement on the snare i can completely null out the hihat from the snare mics, so sometimes i'll mic the hat and the ride--depends on if the song needs that emphasis or not.

    so typically 7 or 8 tracks for drums. if i mic the toms (rare), i'll typically buss them to a stereo track. but it can be as few as 3 and as many as 14 or so (i've got a lot of toms ).


    cheers,
    wade

  2. #92
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    input/ panned
    1 kick= track 1 / center
    2 snare top (bussed to track 2) / center
    3 snare bottom (bussed to track 2)
    4 hi tom= track 3 / hard left
    5 mid tom= track 4 / center
    6 floor tom= track 5 / hard right
    7 hi hat (bussed to track 6)
    8 ride (bussed to track 7) track 6 panned hard left
    9 overhead left (bussed to track 6)
    10 overhead right (bussed to track 7) track 7 panned hard right
    Mackie 32.8+24.E plus automation Mackie HDR 24/96 + MDR 24/96 mtr
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  3. #93
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by coolsoundman
    How many tracks(channels) do you use to record drums and still a very good decent sound?
    Somewhere between 16 and 18. I like to leave 6 tracks for anything else that needs to be recorded. This seems to satisfy a drummer's song.

    If it is a guitarist's song, i use between 16 to 18 tracks for the guitar

    For keyboardists and vocalists, pretty much the same formula applies. It is quite universal.
    [COLOR=DarkSlateBlue]"Tascam, Fostex or Studers don't make hit records...........people do"[/COLOR]
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  4. #94
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    666

    I use 6 mics, I have the worlds shitiest drum mic kit, ($150 CAD kit) which I can actually get some pretty decent sounds out of. BUt I like to put SM57 on the snare instead of the crap they provide. I want to use 8 mics so I can get some room sound, but I have my compressor eating up two of my channels. Guess I could put them with the overheads though...

    Jonah

  5. #95
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    4 tracks is enough for me right now.

  6. #96
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    I usually use either 2 overheads and a kick drum mic or one overhead, kick and snare, submixed to one track on the tape recorder. I prefer to try to control the dynamics by playing the drum set well; if you need to mic every drum just to control the levels (rather than to get a certain sound) then there's something wrong with the way you are playing the instrument.

    EDIT: I understand that a lot of people here work in a professional studio environment where it just isn't possible to tell a drummer who expects perfectly balanced sound to magically come out of reckless cymbal-bashing that the problem is his playing. But when you have the option, why not try to start by recording a good sound rather than recording a mediocre sound and trying to make it better?

  7. #97
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    Usually something like this:
    D112 or similar on Kick
    12" speaker on Kick
    snare top (sm57 or similar preferably beyer m201)
    snare bottom (sm57 or similar preferably beyer m201)
    condenser on snare side (cardoid)
    Tom1 (sm57 or similar preferably beyer m201)
    Tom2 (sm57 or similar preferably beyer m201)
    2 condensers for front left-back right (neumann) miking (cardoid) - Similar to this: http://www.homerecording.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=39030
    2 omnis for stereo ambience
    old Carbon-filter mic for hi-hat

    all in all: 12
    But everything can work and recording with just one omni condenser can work miracles.

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloomboy
    I usually use either 2 overheads and a kick drum mic or one overhead, kick and snare, submixed to one track on the tape recorder. I prefer to try to control the dynamics by playing the drum set well; if you need to mic every drum just to control the levels (rather than to get a certain sound) then there's something wrong with the way you are playing the instrument.

    EDIT: I understand that a lot of people here work in a professional studio environment where it just isn't possible to tell a drummer who expects perfectly balanced sound to magically come out of reckless cymbal-bashing that the problem is his playing. But when you have the option, why not try to start by recording a good sound rather than recording a mediocre sound and trying to make it better?
    Wonderfully put. No matter the number of mic's you still have to beat the players into submission ;-)

  9. #99
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    I usually stick with 7 but sometimes I like to try new things.

  10. #100
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    Anywhere from 6-10 mics depending on kit size.

    1) Kick (inside)
    2) Kick (outside/ in front)
    3) Snare (top)
    4) Rack tom 1
    5) Rack tom 2
    6) Floor tom
    7) Overheads L
    8) Overheads R
    9) Room mic

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