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Thread: Great Tactics and Techniques From Graham Cochrane

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrano View Post
    Well, at least Graham understands you have to give some to get some...
    True. In addition to all his paid stuff, he freely gives a ton of info away.

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    All I can say is that the young generations today have it made when it comes to making music and recording.
    Like the old saying goes...I would give my left nut to be in my 20s or even 30s and have all this gear and all this new technology and all these options.

    Back in my 20s and 30s..."home recording" wasn't even a coined phrase yet, and while there were people doing it, we were loners scratching in the dirt trying to get information and learn the secrets of recording. Now, you can click your mouse for 5 minutes and have access to more information than we could access in 5 years back in the day.

    Still...there was a lot of value to coming up through those lean, in the dirt years...because all that stuff stays with you, and it creates a solid foundation, whereas today, people will spend those 5 minutes clicking on the internet...and end up with information overload, and no simple way to absorb it all so that it makes quick sense. Plus, many are looking for that quick easy path...so it feeds on itself, the rapid overload of info.
    So yeah, there something to be said for taking it easy, absorb things, give stuff time to gel and make sense...especially when you are still very young and can afford to invest yourself for the long haul, rather than looking for a quick solution to everything.

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    ^^^+1
    You want to see something funny, locate the vid where Graham is expounding about how everything you are doing is wrong and your song,mix, voice all suck. Like he's God's gift.
    Win 7 Ult Dell i7 4core 6700ghz 32 GB, 1,2x2, 4 Tb Barracuda HD's running Pro tools 2018 through Allen&Heath Qu-32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gtoboy View Post
    ... locate the vid where Graham is expounding about how everything you are doing is wrong and your song,mix, voice all suck. Like he's God's gift.
    Ahh...how about you link to it...I don't think I want to waste my time looking for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NiclasJ View Post
    Please specify what you think could have been better
    Your original answer was all "you" and not in the "I". I was asking for your take on what was valuable, not what you thought was potentially valuable for me [how would you know?].

    Thanks for the replies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    All I can say is that the young generations today have it made when it comes to making music and recording.
    Like the old saying goes...I would give my left nut to be in my 20s or even 30s and have all this gear and all this new technology and all these options.

    Back in my 20s and 30s..."home recording" wasn't even a coined phrase yet, and while there were people doing it, we were loners scratching in the dirt trying to get information and learn the secrets of recording. Now, you can click your mouse for 5 minutes and have access to more information than we could access in 5 years back in the day.

    Still...there was a lot of value to coming up through those lean, in the dirt years...because all that stuff stays with you, and it creates a solid foundation, whereas today, people will spend those 5 minutes clicking on the internet...and end up with information overload, and no simple way to absorb it all so that it makes quick sense. Plus, many are looking for that quick easy path...so it feeds on itself, the rapid overload of info.
    So yeah, there something to be said for taking it easy, absorb things, give stuff time to gel and make sense...especially when you are still very young and can afford to invest yourself for the long haul, rather than looking for a quick solution to everything.
    Well said, my coworker has been learning home recording and plugs me for a lot of information, and it's all nearly as you theorized -- not how, not even really why, but more 'when'. Like, when do you know to use plate reverb? When do you need compression? At what point in the chain to do you drop this or that effect? Even stuff like stereo imaging, seeing the sound stage as something that can be divided up and instruments assigned/dedicated space on that stage... he found plugins, DAW, and tutorials on how to adjust those things but not much useful stuff on the bigger picture. The 'engineering' part seems to be lost in the information overload. People new to this don't seem to be taught that it's something you dive into and poke around a lot to learn what works, and more importantly - what works for you. Some information is so easy to come by, and yet the 'art' in mixing is not found in that 5 minutes and I think it leaves new home recorders a bit frustrated. "I could find out how to use side chain compression on my kick/bass, but it still sounds like shit".
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    To take the 'start from the bottom' comment, from a technician's perspective I find a good 20% of noob questions are about VERY basic electrical matter, power supplies, phantom power misconceptions and the inability or sheer bloody minded "Oo! I am an 'artiste' can't be doing with that" attitude to signal diagrams*.

    Noobs are ok with the 'building block' approach to audio but if they step outside the available cable/level/impedance situation they are lost. And heaven FOREND they should buy a test meter!

    The old guys were not called "recording engineers" for nothing. Many were graduate electrical engineers and in many cases (BBC e.g.) BUILT much of the kit.

    My proficiency with DAWs is very limited, I know what I need to do to do certain things and sometimes I have to buckle down and learn a New Thing (and have forgotten it next day!) "It" ain't easy and I am too lazy to really learn all the bells and whistles but then I don't want to/can't make music!

    *I don't expect people to understand electronic schematics but a signal flow diagram is just a 'map', gets you from A to B to C in the mixer whatever. MIND YOU! Many people don't learn map reading skills these days! Take away their Sat Nav and they are lost..Literally!

    Dave.

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    There's not that much difference. Sure, a lot more affordable gear and a lot more possibilities.

    But the result is that there are also a lot more paths to follow and, especially, a lot more people on these paths.

    Before you had 15 record labels to choose from, now you have 1500.

    It's different, but not really better. It still takes talent, effort and luck.
    MB Pro, FF400, MKH816, AKG C451-C1/CK8, NT1, B5, MD21, Korg RC168, DEQ830, ADA8000...

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    I admit I didn't watch the whole video, it was too negative IMHO
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    I saw that video. It's not for snowflakes.
    It was actually a good video. All he's saying is that it's not about gear, techniques, mic choices, tricks, etc.
    He's saying that what it comes down to is what it's always been about.
    The song, the arrangements, the performance. In short talent.

    It's always been that way. Guys have done great stuff on a cassette 4 track and guys have done shit in a pro high dollar studio.
    Don't be mad at him for telling the truth.

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