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Thread: DIY Analog Mixing Console

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    frederic's Avatar
    frederic is offline Opinionated Old Fart
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    DIY Analog Mixing Console

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    First, some necessary things...

    • Thank you to those who expressed an interest, both publically and privately. While I'm more than happy to do this, time is also limited so I'm certainly happy I'm not wasting my time.


    • This is offered for "informational purposes only". While I have assembled each building block (more on that as this progresses), I offer ZERO warranty and accept ZERO liability for what you do with this information. Use at your own risk.


    • I am happy to discuss, and help out as is convienent for me. This might become inconvienent tomorrow, and I am not providing technical support. Use at your own risk.


    • This is not a project for the meek. While it's not necessary to have a solid understanding of electronics, it definately helps. Further, if you cannot solder consistantly, and reliably, don't waste your time and money.


    • Some of these building blocks are of my own design, some are from chip manufacturer reference designs, some are "leeched" off schematics in the back of instruction manuals for pro-gear, some are "leeched" off the web. I apologize up front to anyone concerned about copyrights, but alas I'm not able to make a reference for each building block simply because I don't recall where everything came from. I'm just disorganized. Since this is for educational purposes anyway, I see no real issue with this at all.


    Okay, enough of the disclaimer crap. Lets build a mixing console.

    First, lets look at what a mixing console is. Here is the simpliest mixing console we can make, as it's the foundation of all mixers regardless of size. Input circuitry, connected to a common buss, which drives and output. In case it's not obvious, technically a "Y" cord combining the output of two synthesizers (or other) to an input on something else, is a simple mixer. Not a good one mind you, but it illustrates the point.



    So keeping this simplistic drawing in mind, we all know that a "real" mixing console will have many inputs, many busses, and many outputs, with some control "stuff" in between all three components. Buss select, Volume, Pan, EQ, and so forth. Before we design that aspect, let me point out two things that really irk me about modern day, affordable mixing consoles, things that some of the pro consoles I've had the pleasure of using in the past certainly have.

    • "Flip" Switches - Pet Peeve #1

      Most consumer grade analog mixing consoles force you to utilize some of your input channels as tape returns. Look at the illustration below.



      In this example I've drawn the typical wiring scenario for a 32 input, 8 buss mixing console with an 8 track recorder. You can see that the recorder's eight outputs "steal" eight input channels, leaving you with only 24 input channels. The second "problem" is with the eight busses, two of them have to be output busses for monitoring, thus leaving you with six busses to feed the recorder. If you have two eight track recorders, the problem gets worse. Wait, yes, I know that most mixers also have direct outs (often used to feed recorders) as well as a stereo buss. But, wouldn't it be nice to be able to use the direct out for something else, rather than using it to feed your tape recorder? Plus what happens if you want to record input channel 1 to track 14. A patch bay will solve this problem, but so will what Neve, SSL, Amek and Trident (to name a few) did in their professional consoles - they designed in a real "flip" switch. Essentially what they do is design their input channels to be two circuits. One circuit is fed the usual mic, synth, guitar stuff, and has pan, fader, EQ, compressor (etc), and the other circuit is really a minimalistic thing - fader and pan - which feeds different busses. This way, while you're multi-tracking, you feed the tape returns to the simple circuit, adjusting fader and pan, while simultaniously recording on that input channel through the more complicated circuit, and not mixing your tape returns with the new material. Multi-tracking 101! The "flip" switch reverse the two inputs, meaning that the tape return is now fed into the complicated circuit (with compressor, EQ and so forth), and the mic/line input goes into the simple, fader/pan only circuit. There are instances where you'd want to do that, and when your console can't do it all you do is lose more input channels and spend time at the patch bay. Aggrevating. Some manufacturers (Fostex in particular - the old 450 series for example), had a cheesy version of this, where a switch selected between mic/line and tape return, to feed into the only input circuit. You'll see how this turns out and why later on. This is not a feature that is necessary by any means, but it's huge for me.


    • Input Channel Compressors - Pet Peave #2

      In the "old days", mixing consoles had built-in compressors in theiir input channels. Nowadays, you have to buy external outboards and attach them to your "insert" jacks. This works okay I guess for most people, however if recording a large drumkit for example, micing each drum individually, you may 12 mics and need 5-6 compressors to get the mix right. Maybe compressing the whole thing is okay with some people, but I'd much rather avoid that if I can. Might make certain drums sound better, but will "ruin" others, and cymbals, for example. So you'd either have to have a rack full of patchbays and compressors, or have them built into the console. I'm not talking very fancy, digitally controlled compressors, but rather a few parts just to take the edge off and soften, or limit, certain signals as necessary. This was one of the reasons why when I made the step into digital recording, I bought the Tascam TM-D4000 mixing console - it had assignable compressors that could be used on "all" channels (per original brochure). What they don't tell you in the brochure is that there are only eight compressors that you can assign, and only enough horsepower in the machine to run five if you have any other effects going. Six, if compression is all you are doing (no EQ). So that to me defeats the purpose. Anyway, the design here will have an individual compressor (albiet simple) for each channel. If you don't want this feature, you don't have to make it. Simply jumper across.


    So now, with my two pet peeves out in the open, lets look at a diagram which somewhat represents what I've designed for. Obviously you can add or subtract to this as you wish. Each box is a "building block", and over time (more like as I have time!), we'll put the design for each "block".



    Now some of my above paragraphs might make more sense. You can see there are two circuits per input channel, one for the mic/synth/whatever, and one for the tape return for the recording/multi-tracking phase. Flip switch, then the tape return goes through the main circuit and whatever is on the mic/line jacks go through the simple circuit.

    In some "real" mixing consoles, the compressor "block" and the "EQ" block are reversed. This is preference. I prefer it this way, because I can then tweak the EQ to eliminate as much "huffing" from the compressor should that ever be a problem.

    In the upper right I've identified some busses. These are left up to you, as to the quantity of each that you want to spend money on parts, time in soldering, and surface area in knob/switch placement. Obviously the more "stuff" you add, the more flexibility you have, but at the same time if you don't need 48 busses, why waste the time and money. Same for aux busses and so on.

    Main busses are fairly obvious, and often used for two purposes. During recording, they are used to feed inputs on the recorders, and for mixing, they are used for surround sound. If you have six busses, you can mix 5.1, if you have eight busses, you can do 7.1. Generally most studios can get away with eight busses, though I've been involved in projects where 12 or 16 busses were absolutely ideal, but that isn't the common place.

    Aux busses generally are used as "Aux Sends", for feeding outboards (delays, reverb, etc). On consoles that don't have more than one stereo buss for the console room, you can also use say, "Aux 6" as foldback, providing a seperate "mix" for the vocalist, musician, or whomever, seperate from the console room mix. This is useful when your vocalist needs to hear his, or her voice significantly louder than the actual music, or they wander off in pitch like a shrieking cat.

    Pre Fade Listen means that you hear the signal of the selected channel alone, picked off from a point before the fader, so that the fader level has no influence on the PFL level. On some consoles, the PFL signal is routed equally to left and right speakers, on others the position of the pan control is retained. PFL is often used for setting the gain control: on each channel, one at a time, press the PFL button and set the gain so that the main meter reads a good strong level without going into the red. Solo or AFL: Solo, or After Fade Listen, is as above, but the position of the fader is taken into account. It's common for PFL and Solo busses to be mono, as they are more for troubleshooting than anything else.

    Foldback Buss is what I would use to feed musicians (instead of wasting Aux sends). They are similar to the control room mix, except tailored for the musicians. The more of these busses you have (mono or stereo), the more unique simple mixes you can provide for musicians. If you record one musician at a time, you can have one of these (or a pair), or use busses if you want to "spend" them on foldback. If you record four musicians at a time through headsets (i.e., a 4 piece band, or just a rhythm section for example), this might be nice flexibility that not everyone needs.
    Not shown in the diagram are some other obvious things we'd need. Like sub-mixing of the main busses to the control room busses, return aux sends to the main busses and possibly the foldback busses, and so on. I left them off the diagram intentionally to make it easier to read. As we build each building block, we'll discuss what goes where and why. And again, if you are building someting like this, you can add things, or hack off things you dislike, don't want, don't need.
    Last edited by frederic; 12-15-2005 at 18:26.

  2. #2
    technominds's Avatar
    technominds is offline Force of Nature
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    Im impressed that you are even going to attempt this, are you going to make one yourself?

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    frederic's Avatar
    frederic is offline Opinionated Old Fart
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    Quote Originally Posted by technominds
    Im impressed that you are even going to attempt this, are you going to make one yourself?
    I've made each of the building blocks over the years... in fact some of them found homes in things I have used, and will continue to use in my studio going forward. For a while I toyed with the idea of building a large format modular analog console, but decided against it because of the time and energy involved. Someday I may do so, if I ever have the time to work out what to interface the digital control aspect *to* (a PC? Midi?). I believe a hybrid console - analog in the signal path for warmth, digitally controlled for automation and repeatability, is the best combination. This is opinion, not fact of course.

    The idea was to build an expandable, warm analog console, with the ability to "save" every knob, fader, and switch setting via digital "stuff". This way, after spending 4 hours getting the settings correct for a particular flutist with a particular silver flute, I could recall those settings on any input channel as a starting point for the next time I'd record that flutist. Kinda like a library of console settings, to drag and drop from. I figured out how to digitally control everything, and make those settings controllable with knobs, switches and faders, and available for "something" to download, save, upload and restore. I just haven't had the time in the last two years to figure out the "something" part.

  4. #4
    Velvet Elvis's Avatar
    Velvet Elvis is offline Ahh humma humma humma
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    frederic...

    Of course you are gonna give old Velvet Elvis your prototype right!?!?!

    How's the kiddo? Last time I talked with you, you were expecting one!

    Velvet

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    Light's Avatar
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    So you like in-line consoles with compressors, eh? Another SSL user, I take it?

    Yeah, you are deffinatly trying to break my bank. I like it.



    Light

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    frederic's Avatar
    frederic is offline Opinionated Old Fart
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis
    Of course you are gonna give old Velvet Elvis your prototype right!?!?!
    You can make a few of he pieces modular, make a huge frame to put them in, then add as you want to. That's the idea behind modular!

    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis
    How's the kiddo? Last time I talked with you, you were expecting one!
    Born Feb 28th 2005.

    .

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    frederic's Avatar
    frederic is offline Opinionated Old Fart
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    Quote Originally Posted by Light
    So you like in-line consoles with compressors, eh? Another SSL user, I take it?
    Oh yeah.

    Quote Originally Posted by Light
    Yeah, you are deffinatly trying to break my bank. I like it.
    Here is what I intended to do as far as the modularity. I'll talk more about this later on as the building blocks are defined, drawn, and available for all. But in a nutshell, one would make say, 16 input channels, and 8 buss channels. Need two more buss channels for aux sends, you solder them up, and mount them in the chassis next to the main busses. More input channels? Same thing. The only thing that is critical is to decide, up front, how many busses of each kind you want, because the input channel switching circuitry has to be deteremined before you make the input channels. Then duplicate as necessary. The one input channel I made selects between 16 busses, eight aux sends, solo, PFL, and three stereo control room pairs. More than enough.

    I'll be posting parts of the input channel starting next week.

  8. #8
    easychair is offline Force of Nature
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    Frederic,

    Thumbs up on the digitally controlled analog idea. You are in good company there, that's for sure. Klark Teknik, Jim Gamble, etc. If you aren't familiar with Gamble consoles, you should do some Google work on the guy and his stuff, notably the DCX console. Cortek has a software package (downloadable demo) to do the control/recall part, and Mixed Logic makes some cool control surfaces, worth a look for anyone.

    http://www.corteksoft.com/DCXV2.htm

    http://www.corteksoft.com/main.asp

    This should be lots of fun, thanks for the efforts. I don't know how far I wil take it, but I really like the idea of building my own console.
    Happy Holidays

  9. #9
    Velvet Elvis's Avatar
    Velvet Elvis is offline Ahh humma humma humma
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    Quote Originally Posted by frederic
    Born Feb 28th 2005.

    .
    Outstanding... Maybe I knew that, as my latest addition to our family was born last May..

    I dig the console idea that you are putting together... I'd LOVE to have something that is analog, but fully capable of being automated.

    I sold my Mackie 24*8 to buy a Mackie D8b (I bought Mackie because I could afford it)... and I have to say that I much prefer the analog side... not worrying so much about latencies etc... plus the analog just sounded better to my ears... But I truly do love the automation aspects, so I'm torn.

    Velvet

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    frederic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis
    Outstanding... Maybe I knew that, as my latest addition to our family was born last May..
    Congrats! We did briefly talk about both our better halves being pregnant, but didn't get to chat since unfortunately.

    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis
    I dig the console idea that you are putting together... I'd LOVE to have something that is analog, but fully capable of being automated.
    What I'm putting together for this forum is totally analog. What I may put together for myself someday is a two piece console. A large box with tons of jacks, and a long "cord" to a large control surface. The control surface looks like a mixer, feels like a mixer, and acts like a mixer. Except, all it does is tell the "box" what to do. This gives the best of both worlds I think, AND allows the audio "box" to be very close to the audio gear. I'm trying not to get too far into that on this forum, as to keep this project as simple as is realistic.

    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis
    I sold my Mackie 24*8 to buy a Mackie D8b (I bought Mackie because I could afford it)... and I have to say that I much prefer the analog side... not worrying so much about latencies etc... plus the analog just sounded better to my ears... But I truly do love the automation aspects, so I'm torn.Velvet
    One of my pro studios years ago had the 32*8 with several sidecars. I liked it, yet hated it. It didn't sound anywhere near as good as the pro studio before that, which had an antique large format Neve. But I'm comparing a chevy to a rolls royce here, and I have to admit I got more than I paid for with the Mackie. It was a really nice console, considering how dirt cheap it is.

    I did consider the Mackie D8B when it first came out, and at the time I couldn't get squat for under $10K initial investment. While I've spent more that on my tascam "daisy chain" of digital mixers, I got in with just the TMD-4000 (used, less than $2500), and every month or two I added a little TMD-1000 toy mixer off ebay for about $300 or so plus shipping until I had enough input channels. This is why I like modularity - buy what you must have, then add what you can use later on. This analog console design follows that mentality as well.

    BTW, since you have the D8b already, and do enjoy the animation it provides (which is darn good BTW), you might consider assembling some of these building blocks to enhance it. That's partly why I'm putting the effort into break things out into building blocks. If you solder up one of my pre-amps, test it and and like it, you might consider building a few of them, and connecting the outputs to your "line in" jacks on the D8b. I do this with my Tascam TMD4000 actually. I have in my producer's desk a homemade vacuum tube pre-amplifier I made (with no knobs!) which the mic from the vocal booth will eventualyl go to, which in turn will feed one of the line ins on the digital mixer. Not a perfect solution, but it's acceptable. The tube pre-amp is getting old however, and takes a while to warm up to where I like the sound (about 20 minutes, now). It's somewhat of a copy of the old tube-based Neve pre-amps, kinda sorta.

    Anyway, as things get posted here, you might find pieces you like and may consider building as an add-on. Or, maybe you'll just enjoy the giant posts LMAO.

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