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Thread: Snare Drum Mic picks up too much other crap

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    Snare Drum Mic picks up too much other crap

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    The title says it all. I'm trying to isolate a snare drum in a set with one of those clip-on condensers, but the high hat right next to it keeps coming in (even with noise gating), making it hard to add FX to the track. I tried going back to an SM-57, but the snare records dead and dull. Is there another type of mike to use, or should I just EQ the SM-57 track?

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    Your going to get bleed. With an i5 or a 57. I usually use the close snare track to add attack to the snare sound in the over all mix. Most of the snare sound IMO should come from your overheads. I usually have the close snare channel buried enough were bleeding isn;t really going to matter. Some compression would help too on the close snare channel.

    I maybe wrong in this. Hopefully youll hear some other ideas.
    "And the light in the tunnel that you're chasing is a train"

    -Shooter Jennings

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    Is whoever that's playing the snare hitting it properly? They should be attacking the shit outta the snare, make that hooker pop. On the flip side tell whoever it is to settle down on the cymbals, no need to mash them. It may be their thing and thats fine, just tell them to tone down their thing just a bit for the good of the recording. Playing properly will cure most of your micing problems.

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    my go to snare mic is a rode nt3, it's much brighter than a sm57 but it's a hyper cardi so the bleed is manageable even though it's a condenser.


    sometimes the hat's still a bitch though......... it's got a lot to do with the drummer.
    audio?
    seriously, give me negative rep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gcapel
    Most of the snare sound IMO should come from your overheads.
    Glad you said that, cause that's where I currently am getting it from! That and a hidden-in-the-mix close track, just like you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyc
    They should be attacking the shit outta the snare, make that hooker pop. On the flip side tell whoever it is to settle down on the cymbals, no need to mash them.
    I'll give that a shot

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenekeBarnes
    Glad you said that, cause that's where I currently am getting it from! That and a hidden-in-the-mix close track, just like you.

    Well if a kit's played properly, 3 mics is all you'll ever need. OH's and kick.

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    Talking

    Ah, an age old complaint. This is why noise gates were invented. The condenser is going to be brighter but there will be lots of bleed. Here are a couple of tips:

    1) Go to an Shure Beta57A, it is brighter and crackier than a classic 57.
    2) Use a bottom mic, an inexpensive condenser or even another 57 is fine. Don't forget to reverse the polarity (flip the phase) on the bottom mic.
    3) Use smaller, thinner, more polite hi-hats
    5) Work with tuning to maximize tone and volume.
    6) Don't forget you can put tape on cymbals and hats too.

    I also disagree with the "whomp the crap out of the snare as hard as you can" school. Hitting it too hard, which lots of drummers do, will not really make it pop. It can make the sound thuddy muddy and whonky when recorded. It also plays havoc with the overheads, where the snare will end up being the loudest thing, and therefore hard to manipulate in mix. Hitting it real hard can actually choke the sound of the drum.

    A good drummer will know just the right velocity and sweet-spot to hit the snare and toms to get them to "speak", aka "pop". It's more of a wrist action than a forearm thing.

    As my esteemed colleague Johhnyc said, there's no substitute for a drummer who knows how to hit. Sadly, since this is becoming a lost art (like recording itself), we now have samples and sound replacer and drum-a-gog, etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drewcifer666
    Ah, an age old complaint. This is why noise gates were invented. The condenser is going to be brighter but there will be lots of bleed. Here are a couple of tips:

    1) Go to an Shure Beta57A, it is brighter and crackier than a classic 57.
    2) Use a bottom mic, an inexpensive condenser or even another 57 is fine. Don't forget to reverse the polarity (flip the phase) on the bottom mic.
    3) Use smaller, thinner, more polite hi-hats
    5) Work with tuning to maximize tone and volume.
    6) Don't forget you can put tape on cymbals and hats too.

    I also disagree with the "whomp the crap out of the snare as hard as you can" school. Hitting it too hard, which lots of drummers do, will not really make it pop. It can make the sound thuddy muddy and whonky when recorded. It also plays havoc with the overheads, where the snare will end up being the loudest thing, and therefore hard to manipulate in mix. Hitting it real hard can actually choke the sound of the drum.

    A good drummer will know just the right velocity and sweet-spot to hit the snare and toms to get them to "speak", aka "pop". It's more of a wrist action than a forearm thing.

    As my esteemed colleague Johhnyc said, there's no substitute for a drummer who knows how to hit. Sadly, since this is becoming a lost art (like recording itself), we now have samples and sound replacer and drum-a-gog, etc.

    I agree with some of what you say, though I think you're making it a bit difficult. However I still say you gotta hit those drums, never said forearm, it is all wrist, but you can't be a pussy when you're hitting a drum.

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    I'm not saying an SM57 is the only choice, but if you're saying that the snare sounds dull through the 57, then there's something wrong with the tuning. It shouldn't sound "BAD" through a 57 even if you might prefer another mic. That's sort of besides the point, because it doesn't address your bleed issue.

    As far as the bleed is soncerned, like has been mentioned, you will get bleed, it's normal. You should get most of your sound through the overheads and just use the snare track to enhance as much or as little as you need to.
    I totally disagree with using a gate on your snare. If a drummer plays with any kind of dynamics and uses ghost strokes, a gate will be a nightmare. Either you'll have to set it so low that other things will occassionally bleed through anyway. Or, if you set it high enough so that other things don't bleed through, then you won't get those ghost (or "grace") notes coming through.
    Like Johnny says, you should be hitting the snare with authority. And make sure it's tuned well, too. You can't fix it in the mix if it isn't.

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