View Poll Results: Electric Vs Acoustic Drums.

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  • Electric

    20 21.74%
  • Acoustic

    72 78.26%
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Thread: Electric Vs. Acoustic drums.

  1. #1
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    Electric Vs. Acoustic drums.

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    Hi, I was wondering Which you guys preferred. Electric drums, or acoustic drums for recording? And Why? I'm Unsure to go with drum mics for my set, or an electric set for no distortion. I've mostly seen people with acoustic sets, I assumed it was for more real drum sound. I figured with an electric drum set i wouldn't have to worry about distortion/bass trapping. Which do you prefer?

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    I think you should go with mic'ing an acoustic set. Electronic drums are... ya know, electronic. Acoustic drums also give you a chance to experiment with sound. Some drum plug ins sound great, but it doesn't give you the same sense of accomplishment when you get a good sound out of an acoustic kit. Whatever suits you.

    What do you mean by distortion? If you mean distortion as in guitar effect, then your mic levels are WAY too high.
    If life gives you melons, you may be dyslexic.

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    [/QUOTE]What do you mean by distortion? If you mean distortion as in guitar effect, then your mic levels are WAY too high.[/QUOTE]


    I meant distortion as in, my last demo recorded my drums sounded like fuzz. It may have been the mic(s) that's why I was wondering. The bass Drum rattled the whole set and it picked up every bit of noise from the set. Maybe the mics were positioned wrong? I tried many different angles.

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    If you want it to sound like music, use a real drumset.

  5. #5
    RAMI Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Wack View Post
    The bass Drum rattled he whole set and it picked up every bit of noise from the set. Maybe the mics were positioned wrong? I tried many different angles.
    Sounds to me like the mics were doing their job. It's not the mic's fault that your drums rattled. Get rid of the noise your kit is making, put new skins on, tune it properly...THEN maybe you can make a judgement about micing drums.

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    Thank you for the advice, Ill change all the heads and have to get the tuning to perfection. So I'm just going to stick with the acoustic set as that's what everyone seems to prefer. Thanks guys

  7. #7
    dintymoore Guest
    I usually use a hybrid of both worlds.

    Cymbals on samples & drum modules suck, suck and then suck. The kicks and toms on electrics are generally good.

    In the end, it depends on the song. A lot of times people like what the songs they like were done with.

    I'd like to be a purist and say real drums 'cause that's what I grew up on but the truth is that on some songs real drums sound worse than drum machines, and the opposite is true too.

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    In my humble thingummyjig, there really is no contest. Electric drums are pretty neat and apart from some of the irritatingly loud thuds from the kick pedal {you'd be surprized how much those sounds travel}, will cause your neighbours to love you. The electric drums, triggers and samples are getting better, more realistic and I guess, easier to store. More and more mainstream songs use them and clubs, churches, studios and 'homeys' have demonstrated how versatile they are.

    But they are not acoustic drums.

    It's partly my age and I'm unashamedly biased but it's acoustic drums for me. Though I'm not a drummer, I had a kit for 13 years {a Mirage} and it served me well and I was fortunate that my neighbours never bothered about the noise. Then when my family and I moved to our present place in 2003, I started to feel a little self conscious about noise so I gave away my drums and bought a Roland TD6 which I thought was a good idea. But, you know, though I liked the kick and some of the toms and snare sounds, the hi hat and cymbals just never did it for me. I made all kinds of modifications, bought a better brain that had 8 outputs, a mesh head snare for rimshots etc but after a year I went back to an acoustic set and sold the Roland. I bought an Arbiter flat-lites kit {the whole thing can be stored in two bags} and set about reading up on micing drums and listening to drum sounds in a way I hadn't before and began experimenting with different snare sounds and trying to see how I could get some of the sounds that I realized I dug. In the old days, once all the other instruments got on board, I was dissatisfied with my drum sounds. I could never work out why I got better sounds {and a kick you could dance with} with a small cassette recorder in my pre-multitrack days.
    I'm no expert, but I am of the opinion that there are a number of different ways of recording drums and many variations of sounds across the kit. As frustrating as it can sometimes be, it's also great fun and truly rewarding figuring out different strokes. You can do so much with acoustic drums. Which is not to say that you can't with the other guys.
    As for electric drums, I have to say, for the most part, I like them. But I don't want to use them.....

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    I have acoustic drums, and I always use samples on my drum tracks. It's easier, quieter and the only people who will ever know that they are fake are the people who use the same sample library that I use.

    If acoustic drums weren't so bloody loud, I'd use them more, but that reason alone, I rarely use them. So I guess in a sense, I prefer samples.

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    The way of the future ?

    I just saw something that I've not seen before though it may be old hat;

    http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/articl...10_weeklyemail

    While it's true that acoustic drums are loud, using them and negotiating with the neighbours makes a UN diplomat of us all !

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