View Poll Results: Electric Vs Acoustic Drums.

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  • Electric

    20 21.74%
  • Acoustic

    72 78.26%
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Thread: Electric Vs. Acoustic drums.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by grimtraveller View Post
    I just saw something that I've not seen before though it may be old hat;

    http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/articl...10_weeklyemail
    I'm surprised it's taken anyone this long to come up with something as simple as a drum set with triggers. What would be cool would be if you could flip the drums around and have them be mesh heads with triggers on one side and normal heads on the other.

  2. #12
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    Honestly, there are some samples out there that I could not identify as "fake" in a mix. So... It's really hard to say.

    I go "accoustic" only because I don't have the software to do otherwise.

    I imagine samples would be hot as hell for a few songs... But I would start to miss the variety of sounds I can get with drums n' mics.

  3. #13
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    I know it's not popular, but I voted 'electronic', for a couple reasons. There's no acoustic or phase prob's for one.. For 2, midi and samples ARE getting very good, the best ones out there, maybe some of you guys can tell the difference, but 99.9% of the world can't. Rubber pads are kinda sucky, but your sticks bounce on mesh heads just like real drums. I think the avg HR joe with the avg kit and avg room can get a better sound out of elec. drums vs real ones.

    Ya it's true, you CAN get a better sound out of real drums and mics. IF you have a great treated room, IF you have a great drum kit, and IF you're isolated enough to keep street / kid / furnace noise out, etc.. I have none of the above. Plus, I'm not a drummer, I kinda suck at drums, and it's a lot easier to edit midi than audio, move timing of a drum hit, change velocity, change that crash hit to a china, etc.

    Not to mention all the noise.. I can play in the middle of the night, and my wife and neighbors still like me
    http://www.supr-star.com/ - suprstar studios

  4. #14
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    electric and vts all the way ,i have an acoustic but in my room i can not make it sound good (its 10x10 with a pitched celing) ,vts gives me access to kits i dont have i can track late at night any mistakes are easily edited timming issues one click dont like the tempo one click again all sorted ,alot of people can not tell the differance when its in the track.

    ok certain thngs you cannot do that you can on an acoustic but for 90% of the music i do vts is fine.

  5. #15
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    I use drum samples. But then again I am not doing rock or jazz or... you know, stuff that needs a real acoustic drum set. In fact, even if I use samples of acoustic drums, they get messed with so much that they end up sounding electronic drums anyway.
    [QUOTE=George Carlin]Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.[/QUOTE]

    [QUOTE=Oscar Wilde]All art is useless.[/QUOTE]

  6. #16
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    Acoustic will always yield the best results when done right.. but doing it right is hard and expensive. Having the right mics, right room, right setup, interface with enough inputs... not everyone has access to this, so when you dont electric will suffice. And yes there are some believable samples out there so it will work. But acoustic drums will always be the best.. just difficult to record properly.

    And what you say about distortion... the only way you get distortion/fuzz/buzz from recording drums is when you have the mic pres too hot causing clipping.. turn the levels down until there is no clipping (never letting levels get into red) and you'll be good to go.

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  8. #17
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    Thanks for all the info guys, I'm really unsure what to go with. I'm going to give the mics another try this weekend and see how it goes.

  9. #18
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    Talking

    Wow... This is a great thread. I've been playing drums for 20 years, so take what I'm saying with a grain of that. hehe...

    I started getting serious about recording my drums about a year ago. The recordings I made sucked pretty badly. Then I found this forum about 8 months ago, and my recordings have been steadily improving ever since. Comments that "recording acoustic drums is expensive" are definitely true, but then again, if you're trying to get the same sound out of electric drums, you're likely gonna pay more. I almost bought a $5000.00 Roland Electric kit some years ago, but decided to spend $1600.00 on a nice acoustic instead. Even with the kit included, I haven't spent on my studio what I would have spent on that electric drum kit, and I'm getting some pretty good results! The mics I use are mostly sub-par. I've been told my room is far from a "good recording space", and I'm sure I'm doing lots and lots of things wrong. But I'm thoroughly enjoying the ride.

    Also, something to consider is - if you use electric drums, and you want to record your other instruments, a lot of the drum mics you would otherwise buy could be used on other instruments... So, if you go the acoustic route, you'll most likely end up with a better studio situation, AND better skills to record things correctly.

    Anyway... I started a thread some time ago with the latest attempt at recording something in my basement, and have got good comments. If you want another guy's opinion and recordings to back it up, please visit here, and give it a listen.

    Everything was recorded acoustically, and I had a blast doing it.

    Also - if you can record acoustic drums and get them to sound half-way decent, you'll be able to record anything. It just takes a little time and practice, along with a few bucks. Talk to Greg L, and listen to his stuff. His mics are far from "industry standard", and his drum recordings are phenomenal. They are just as good, and in some cases, better than stuff you hear on the radio.

    Anyway... Great thread.... Thanks for asking the question and starting the poll.
    --PoeticIntensity
    ArtCitySound.com

  10. #19
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    Yeah I'm Thinking drum mics would benefit me in the long run. any suggestions on a decent pair? All I've had the chance to use were some CAD PRO-7 7's. 7 piece set, they were fairly nice.

  11. #20
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    I just wrote a very detailed (and long) reply, but then I deleted it because I realised that it all boils down to this:

    Unless you are (or have access to) a very good drummer, with the best mics and the best recording environment money can buy (which, with respect, not many of us are / have, which is why we're on a 'Home-Recording' forum!) then I would say you should do with either an electronic kit and / or midi programming.

    It's all well and good saying acoustic drums are best - undoubtedly, they are in a live situation! - but in the real world of the home-recordist, the simplest and most cost-effective way of getting good (pro sounding) drum tracks for your music, is to go electro.

    There's a whole stack of pro's out there using MODERN electronic kits, triggers and software because of the time, money and effort saved. And seriously, the sound is nothing short of BRILLIANT these days. Every parameter and every bit of programming can be tweaked at any time, and HERE'S THE TRUTH: 99.9% of our audience will not know the difference. All they will love is the killer drum sound you've got.

    Sorry, this hasn't been as brief as I hoped, but in short I say, for recording, go electro! Your tracks will be transformed for the better. Programming drums is in itself a bit of an skill (maybe even an art-form), but you'll learn quickly and nothing yields such easy, pro-sounding results for us 'real world' (skint) home recordists!

    Now, let the battle commence... ha ha ha....

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