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Thread: Drum Recording

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    Drum Recording

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    Could use some advice on drum micing. I've got 6 mics on my drums. 2 over heads (L&R), kick, snare ( on top), 1 over large tom and floor tom and 1 mic over 2 smaller tom's.
    I get some bleed in from one mic to the other. So, basically most mics pick up something other than what they are intended to pick up.
    My question is, how do I overcome that situation? More mics, less mics? Would putting a gate on each mic help?
    Anxious for some feedback!
    Thanks,
    Don.....

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    Hi dsealer,
    The first thing to do is work out if it's really a problem.
    Usually bleed isn't a big problem and, if it is, there's usually something specific that can be tweaked or fixed to make it acceptable.

    Everyone's approach is different but generally it's accepted that the overheads capture the kit - Bleed there isn't really a concern.

    For tom mics I know a lot of people gate regardless. That's your call. I usually do to be fair.

    Kick and snare mics (and hihat if there is one) I usually won't gate.
    Snare and hihat are usually the most likely to be problem so I'll be careful and close with mic position and sometimes choose a narrower-than-cardioid mic, if necessary.
    Careful selection of hihat can help, it it's too loud, and even repositioning the thing to be a few inches higher or farther away from the snare can make a huge difference.

    If you've got a hi-hat-basher then you're fighting the odds. Have a word with the drummer if that's a problem.

    Don't underestimate the impact of the small changes.

    If you still want to gate after all that then cool - strokes for folks.
    Every genre, and engineer, is different but just don't assume that bleed = bad.
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    but just don't assume that bleed = bad. [/QUOTE]
    Yea I do understand there will always be some bleed through. I guess I was wondering what others do to minimize it. I appreciate your thoughts. I'll make some adjustments on the snare/high hat mic.
    Thanks,
    Don.....

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    Bleed is ambience that you like.
    Ambience is bleed you don't like.

    All you can do is point the mics toward the toms, pointing away from the cymbals.

    Also, there is no way to get complete isolation. The trick is to get more of what you are pointing the mics at than the other stuff around the kit.

    It also helps when the drummer plays with the appropriate dynamics.
    Jay Walsh
    Farview Recording. I am also the forum spokesmodel for Terasyne Amplification

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    That's your overheads and you may not need them considering the other 4 cover pretty well. If the room is small, you really dont need them. The problem is if you think you need OH for cymbals as you turn them up in the mix you will bring up the whole kit. That will mitigate some of what your other 4 mics are doing for you.

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    I would advise the opposite. Use the overheads to get the kit, and then fill in with the close mics.

    If you get rid of the overheads and use the tom mics to get the cymbals, you can't EQ the toms a lot without making the cymbals sound strange. Example: if you want more attack from the toms and add a bunch of 3-4k, think of what adding a bunch of upper mids to the cymbals is going to sound like.
    Jay Walsh
    Farview Recording. I am also the forum spokesmodel for Terasyne Amplification

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    Quote Originally Posted by Farview View Post
    I would advise the opposite. Use the overheads to get the kit, and then fill in with the close mics.

    If you get rid of the overheads and use the tom mics to get the cymbals, you can't EQ the toms a lot without making the cymbals sound strange. Example: if you want more attack from the toms and add a bunch of 3-4k, think of what adding a bunch of upper mids to the cymbals is going to sound like.
    To me, this makes more sense and seems like a solid approach.
    DM60 Tunes: The Collection

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    What I like to do is:
    1. Use a good room to record the drums
    2. Use overheads to get the best representation of the kit and,
    3. Close-mic each drum, hi-hat and ride
    4. Record the performance into ur DAW
    5. Export all of ur close-mic tracks (I.e., not overheads).
    6. Go buy Superior Drummer 3 from Toontrack.
    7. Install Superior Drummer 3.
    8. Using the Tracker feature of SD3, import your close mic tracks
    9. Replace the close mics with SD3’s sounds.
    10. Keep your overhead mics (although u can just replace the crashes w SD3’s crashes) if you want. You can even recreate your drummer’s Kit within SD3 and save it for later use again.

    I realize not everyone has an extra $500 lying around for SD3. But not many within this forum has all the mics, gear, money and sampling experience to get the sounds they are trying so hard to get... sounds that SD3 has invested in so u can go straight into creating.

    That’s my $.02. ��
    Chad Austin
    Producer, engineer, musicianwww.thelogicmusic.comwww.chadaustin.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChadAustin View Post
    6. Go buy Superior Drummer 3 from Toontrack.
    There are plenty of other solutions for drum replacement.

    I have always said that if I ever needed more than 3-4 mics on a kit - like if I really wanted that close, squashed, hyped sound - I'd rather use triggers.

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    Depending on the drum part you can just cut around the toms in your daw if they're not playing alot. Easier and more final than using a gate which might need adjusting as you turn tom tracks up and down.
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