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Thread: line out from amp?

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    fuzball005 is offline Newbie
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    line out from amp?

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    hey all,

    I'm new to this forum so bear with me. i've been trying to setup a recording station. I have most of the equipment that i need (mixer, mics, computer, etc). I've been mic'ing my guitar amp so far and have decent results but I notice there is a "line out" plug on the guitar amp (its on most guitar amps too). I want to try and connect that to my mixer so I can free up a mic channel on my mixer but i haven't had any success. I get this real low (not to mention utterly incoherent) noise from the "line out" plug. I am wondering what exactly is going on, how should i got about using this line out. I don't believe its a line out to another cab but the signal doesn't seem to be line level either. I hope some of you more experienced recorders have had this problem before so you can help me out!!! Thanks in advance!

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    muzeman is offline 1K Silver Member
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    fuzball005,
    Welcome!

    Couple of questions.
    What type of amp is it?
    Is the line out stereo or two mono RCA plugs,left and right?
    Are you sure it's not a 8 ohm speaker out?
    How are you connecting it to the mixer?

    Best to you,
    Pete
    Pete

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    eamici is offline Newbie
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    Line out hum

    For what it's worth I've hadthe same frustration with Line out buzz from both my Peavey 560 power mixer and Ampeg bass amp running 1/4" jacks from the amps to a Porta studio. SOme of the hum I found to improve when plugging the amps into different wall outlets, but it's still noticeable.

    Any help someone can provide will be helpful to me as well.
    Thanks

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    eamici is offline Newbie
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    Line out hum

    For what it's worth I've hadthe same frustration with Line out buzz from both my Peavey 560 power mixer and Ampeg bass amp running 1/4" jacks from the amps to a Porta studio. SOme of the hum I found to improve when plugging the amps into different wall outlets, but it's still noticeable.

    Any help someone can provide will be helpful to me as well as fuzzball.
    Thanks

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    Seanmorse79 is offline 1K Silver Member
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    Generally speaking, people usually don't have great recording results using the line out from an amp. Unless you're working with an effects unit that's acting as a preamp and a cabinet simulator (even then...), you're usually much better off recording with a mic.

    I realize you're trying to free up the XLR's on your mixer, but , I'd imagine you'd even be better off using an adapter to 1/4" than recording directly from the line-out of your amp (even though that's not the best way to do it). Without the benefit of your cabinet & speakers, the sound is usually very nasty, tinny, and harsh. Plus, high frequency noise generated by pickups, lights, refrigerator, etc... is going to be somewhat magnified having not passed through amp speakers.

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    fuzball005 is offline Newbie
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    Thanks for all your replies thus far,

    As for the type of amp, it's a Marshall and its one of those "emualted Line out". In the manual, they say you can directly connect it to any recording device for ease of recording (so far its been nothing but trouble...lol ) Anyway, I'll most likely mic the amp (but that means getting another good mic $$$). I'm just one of those guys that just likes to figure out how things work and won't give up till it does so I'm interested in finding out how to solve this "emulated line out" issue. The preamp/effects idea seems to make sense, but in the manual it says (i think) that its already at line level. I'm still unclear about this "line level" term and I notice someone mentioning something about impedance, could you please help explain some of these terms and theories to lamos like me!! Thanks for all your help guys.

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    TexRoadkill is offline Audio Bum
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    You should be able to plug right into a regular line level input on your mixer and get some type of decent sound. If it doesn't work on a line or mic input than there something in the amp settings that isn't right or it's defective.

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    muzeman's Avatar
    muzeman is offline 1K Silver Member
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    I'm no expert but I'll tell you what I know.

    Guitar inputs are high impedance,or on a recorder Hi Z,usually 1/4" unbalanced.

    Mic level ins are either,XLR or 1/4" TR.
    XLR is balanced,1/4" TR isn't.

    Line level in's and outs can be either XLR balanced,TRS 1/4" balanced, TR 1/4" unbalanced,and RCA unbalanced.
    There are other less popular connectors also.
    Line levels can be at either,-10,semi pro/consumer or,+4,pro levels.

    Speaker level outs are usually at 8 ohms,but the better quality speakers go much lower.

    Headphone outs are higher because they use an amp.
    (actually an amplified line level signal,I think.)

    Some of these are interchangeable within the specific level,ie;-10&+4 line levels.,but the signal quality is degraded.

    The definate no no's are,plugging anything but a speaker into an speaker out.
    Plugging a line level into a mic level input.
    Plugging a line level into a hi z input.

    As far a impediance the best I can give you is,impeadance is resistance,and guitars need to see high impeadance to sound good.
    There's a lot of folks around here who could tell you much more!

    Do a search on what your interested in and read THIS article,it's worth it.(except for my dumb questions!) -

    http://www.homerecording.com/bbs/sho...threadid=27030

    Hope this helps.

    Best to you,
    Pete

    BTW-I would say there should be no problem plugging the Marshall out into a mixer.
    It's actually called an emulated CD out isn't it?
    If so you have to plug it into a stereo input or 2 mono inputs panned L&R.
    Must be somthing wrong with the amp.
    Pete

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