Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: What is the best order in mixing tracks?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    335800

    What is the best order in mixing tracks?

    Sign in to disable this ad
    Shall i start mixing with the drums track first or with the vocal ones then the drums and the music come after?
    I mean which fader should be adjusted first and which is second and so on........
    Thanks for caring
    Last edited by semsem612; 1 Week Ago at 11:22.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ranelagh Tasmania
    Age
    66
    Posts
    7,225
    Thanks
    142
    Thanked 446 Times in 366 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474855
    There is no particular best order of mixing tracks, and it mostly boils down to personal taste.

    However, I do have a preferred order.


    1 I get the drums sorted first.
    2 I then bring up the bass so that drums and bass sound happy together
    3 Lead vocals is next. All going well, the song should sound great with just these three elements.
    4 Other instruments come next in no particular order.
    5 Finally, backing vocals get added.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to gecko zzed For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
    Posts
    2,763
    Thanks
    639
    Thanked 466 Times in 446 Posts
    Rep Power
    4124857
    kick, bass and lead vocal first. Then harmony vox, snare, toms, overheads and keyboards. Guitars last.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    2,302
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 204 Times in 192 Posts
    Rep Power
    5430272
    I usually just bring up all the faders and then start fixing whatever sticks out at me first. I suppose that's usually either drums or vocals first just because in the things I record, those generally require the biggest interventions, and they need to be right for anything else to make sense. I really just jump around willy-nilly until I can't find anything else to mess with, though.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to ashcat_lt For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Fremantle, Australia
    Age
    60
    Posts
    5,121
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 129 Times in 114 Posts
    Rep Power
    11360171
    I usually start with the drums, but only because it is a single instrument with multiple mics, so to be able to treat it like a single instrument it needs to be roughly mixed. It will get worked on again later when the mix comes together.

    Bass next, then the guitars, keys etc. Then I treat the band as a single instrument while I sort out the vocals for tone and levels, etc.

    Then I listen to the mix as a whole and adjust it all again, and again, making sure everything can be heard, especially the vocals, then look for any problems with mix clarity.

    Finally does the mix now sound any good? If not roll around it all again. I constantly adjust things while the mix is playing on loop, sometimes things I do are undone again if they don't work.

    And don't forget to change the volume, listen soft, listen loud, does it still sound good at all volumes? Multiple monitors if you have them.

    And take breaks, leave the mix for half hour and leave the room, coffee, food, freash air, then come back, what does the first play after a break sound like?

    Hope this helps, it's hard to explain mixing, to me its almost meditation I get so connected to it.

    Alan.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to witzendoz For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Age
    32
    Posts
    4,966
    Thanks
    245
    Thanked 223 Times in 223 Posts
    Rep Power
    18052793
    Quote Originally Posted by gecko zzed View Post
    There is no particular best order of mixing tracks, and it mostly boils down to personal taste.
    Yep. But I usually do:
    1. Drums (kick, snare, OHs, toms)
    2. Ancillary percussion (that, or I defer this to 9)
    3. Bass
    4. Lead vox
    5. Rhythm guitar
    6. Other rhythm instruments
    7. Misc. lead instruments
    8. BGVox
    9. Additional weird noises.

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Portland OR & Loa Angeles CA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    From a purely philosophical position, I would agree closely with [MENTION=179866]wentzendoz. However, it's probably best to just bring up faders in groups, and get a reasonable "balance and level", and then listen to the track a few times. The levels won't be right, and the mix won't sound good (yet), but it gives you an opportunity to listen to the track and find the interesting parts of the song... the parts that catch your attention.

    Mixing is the art of capturing a listener's attention, so it's best to find those interesting parts and focus most of your energy on those. That is not to say that you shouldn't work hard on everything else, but you should think about it in a way that maximizes you're potential for capturing attention.

    As an example, think about times you've listened to songs and certain things just stand out and draw your attention. Who knows, the drums on that track may have sounded like crap, but you didn't care, because the guitar parts were captivating. Again, I want to emphasize I'm not stating that you should ignore or slack on anything, just pointing out that your focus should be thoughtful and intentional.

    Eventually you'll get to a point at which you can easily through a rough mix together, and in short time, make everything sound really good. But if your skills stop there, you'll never progress, because all you'll ever be able to do is get things sounding good. But, if you are a badass at making things interesting, drawing and keeping the listeners attention, and make them think, "wow, that's a cool sound", then you'll be ahead of most.

    Sorry if this was tangential to your original question, but I find that looking at mixing in this way makes me feel more creative and keeps me motivated to get better and better.

    All the best!
    Last edited by JDsound; 6 Days Ago at 22:08. Reason: Misspelled member's tag

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Where they play the West Coast Sound
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    0
    Interesting responses. I tend to mix as others mentioned - drums, bass, lead vocals, then whatever is left. It seems like rock oriented guys do it this way. I've heard of pro guys who start with the vocals on pop records, since that's many times the most important element. I would suggest trying a few different methods and see which one works for you.

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    ArizonaMaybe
    Age
    67
    Posts
    8,951
    Thanks
    86
    Thanked 101 Times in 94 Posts
    Rep Power
    9365099
    Quote Originally Posted by ashcat_lt View Post
    I usually just bring up all the faders and then start fixing whatever sticks out at me first. I suppose that's usually either drums or vocals first just because in the things I record, those generally require the biggest interventions, and they need to be right for anything else to make sense. I really just jump around willy-nilly until I can't find anything else to mess with, though.
    That's me. 'Faders up, 'Round and round on the big stuff. Then somewhere half way through the most of that I'll branch off focusing on combos of things ('what/how are these 'guys doing together?) and more and more single items, and automation.
    Add.. Gain/clip automation should have been 'early on in there.
    Placebo stomps 96k ....... Recent projects
    Ray Catfish Copeland 'Got Love Jim Goodman 'Southern Steel

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    48
    Posts
    18,122
    Thanks
    645
    Thanked 522 Times in 461 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474861
    Quote Originally Posted by witzendoz View Post
    I usually start with the drums, but only because it is a single instrument with multiple mics, so to be able to treat it like a single instrument it needs to be roughly mixed. It will get worked on again later when the mix comes together.

    Bass next, then the guitars, keys etc. Then I treat the band as a single instrument while I sort out the vocals for tone and levels, etc.

    Then I listen to the mix as a whole and adjust it all again, and again, making sure everything can be heard, especially the vocals, then look for any problems with mix clarity.

    Finally does the mix now sound any good? If not roll around it all again. I constantly adjust things while the mix is playing on loop, sometimes things I do are undone again if they don't work.

    And don't forget to change the volume, listen soft, listen loud, does it still sound good at all volumes? Multiple monitors if you have them.

    And take breaks, leave the mix for half hour and leave the room, coffee, food, freash air, then come back, what does the first play after a break sound like?

    Hope this helps, it's hard to explain mixing, to me its almost meditation I get so connected to it.

    Alan.
    That pretty much my style as well. Though I tend to start mixing at the same time I start recording. So I usually have most things in order before I even reach the actual 'mix' stage.

    But yeah, then I cycle back again and start with the basics as Alan does.
    PC Win7-64-24G i7-4790k/Cubase 9 Pro 64-bit/2-Steinberg UR824's/ADAM A7x/Event TR8/SS Trigger Plat Deluxe/Melodyne 4 Studio/Other things that don't mean anything if a client shows up not knowing what it wants.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Mixing Drums - One Mic Track
    By adam79 in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-15-2012, 04:11
  2. I want to start recording drums at home!
    By adrumskinner in forum Drums and Percussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-09-2012, 13:10
  3. need help to start tracking and mixing
    By Buzi in forum Newbies
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-24-2004, 11:19
  4. Recording Drums For First Time - Where do I start?
    By colish_04 in forum Drums and Percussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-25-2004, 07:12
  5. Can you tell ACKUS to start a new track as a Stereo track?
    By mixsit in forum Cakewalk / Sonar Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-18-2003, 10:21

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •