Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Powered Mixer for recording

  1. #1
    RandyW is offline Force of Nature
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    588
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    55605

    Powered Mixer for recording

    Sign in to disable this ad
    I need to buy a mixer for playing out. I've looked at a couple and ran across the Yamaha EMX5000. Then it hit me to maybe do a little killing 2 birds with one stone. This mixer also has inserts for each mono channel, so why not use it for recording. I should be able to patch in the Delta 1010 ins and outs through the inserts? No?

    I'm thinking that will work but I'm not sure where this will be putting the signal in the chain through the mixer, I know I won't be able to use external effects if the outputs are already occupied. But my questions are will this bypass the EQ settings for each channel as well? Will the fact that the mixer has several fairly large amplifiers built in increase noise levels?

    I'm using a couple of inferior mixers right now an old as in ancient 8 channel Foxtex and a lets just call it the B word MX3242. So it would take much to make me happy. I do most of my recording with external preamps direct into the 1010s. But I like to run my mixes through the mixer for mixing direct to cassette or CD. I haven't quite figured out how to do it with my very basic GTP 3 software

  2. #2
    SouthSIDE Glen's Avatar
    SouthSIDE Glen is offline independentrecording.net
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Chicago, IL. USA
    Age
    54
    Posts
    10,529
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    8088745
    As a general rule of thumb, PA mixers will tend to be noisier mixers - in several ways, not just S/N ratio - than mixers designed for recording; they just don't need the same tolerances of specification on sound. You *can* use a PA mixer for recording, but I wouldn't expect results any better than what you're getting now.

    You might want to look at the "two birds with one stone" the other way around; get a halfway decent recording mixer that fit's your needs, build it into a rack with a power amp or two, and let it double as your PA mixer. One of the main bands I work with does this with a Mackie VLZ Pro and a couple of amplifiers to route to their wedges as well as drive their PA stacks.

    It sounds great live; we heard the distinct difference in quality on the very first gig with the new mixer. And it gives the owner an acceptable quality mixer for use back at the ranch as well.

    G.
    Glen J. Stephan,
    SouthSIDE Multimedia Productions

    RECORDING RESOURCES AND INFO SITE:

  3. #3
    RandyW is offline Force of Nature
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    588
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    55605
    You must have been reading my mind.

    But I'll have a slight variation since I really don't like taking my nicer guitars and amps and other toys out of the house.

    I'll use the B word MX3242 mixer I already have buy a Crown power amp stick it all in a small rack and be done with it. I've heard that the Mackies aren't a mixer you want to haul around much. It sounds like there are some problems with ribbon connectors working loose. Anway it will give me ground to gets something nicer and only a few hundred more to do than what the Yamaha mixer would have cost.

    Thanks for backing up my conscience we needed it.

  4. #4
    SouthSIDE Glen's Avatar
    SouthSIDE Glen is offline independentrecording.net
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Chicago, IL. USA
    Age
    54
    Posts
    10,529
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    8088745
    Quote Originally Posted by RandyW
    I've heard that the Mackies aren't a mixer you want to haul around much. It sounds like there are some problems with ribbon connectors working loose.
    Well, this guy has a 1604 VLZ Pro that he's had in his rack for going on two years now. Between his bands and his DJ work, that rack goes on the road probably an average of 3-4 times a month, and he hasn't had a single problem. And he bought it used off of eBay.

    My 1604 VLZ (pre-Pro) is 7 years old and has been used as a location mixer many times over those years, and nary a problem with it that entire time. I'm going to be retiring it Real Soon Now, but not for any reason having to do with mobile use or anything breaking. That thing could be run over by a car and not get a scratch.

    Anyway, it doen't have to be a Mackie; that was just a real-life example I could give you. But just about anything above a Berhie or Yamaha MG is going to give you quieter curcuitry and better mic pres than your average PA mixer will. Just buy something built like a tank and you'll be OK.

    G.
    Glen J. Stephan,
    SouthSIDE Multimedia Productions

    RECORDING RESOURCES AND INFO SITE:

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-05-2011, 23:49
  2. mixer and amp for speaker help!!!
    By washburn10 in forum Newbies
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-17-2002, 17:37
  3. help using the mixer together with the amp
    By washburn10 in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2002, 12:13
  4. help mixer + amp
    By washburn10 in forum Digital Recording & Computers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2002, 12:11
  5. Is it possible to connect a powered mixer to a porta 02?
    By toz71 in forum TASCAM User Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-18-2000, 00:02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Special 93% Offer

Got beats? Samples? Mixing and mastering services? Get a head start with this 93% OFF special offer!