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Thread: Cut 12 vs Cut 98 on HP filter -- question for the pros here

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Massive Master View Post
    *Assuming* it's [dB/Octave] -- If you need anything more that 6 -- or 12 on an extreme scale, figure you've got problems that probably aren't easily solved. When you get into elliptic filters (24dB and more per octave), you sort of need a specific reason for that sort of stuff. Mid-side vinyl cutting for example. Still -- it's a rare occasion where you need something that steep even with vinyl.
    That was kinda my original curiosity and question when I saw the "98cut"...I mean, that is quite steep-n-fast.

    I'll use very narrow bandwidth cuts to remove clicks/noises/artifacts from tracks...etc...but I'm not going much past 20dB, and even that is only on the worst offenders...but I don't use drastic stuff like that just for adjusting and EQ'ing for tone.

    I guess in the end...if it sounds right to you...

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    I just wanted to get rid of all low end rumble on the guitars b/c there are double tracks, and it was adding up. I never saw the 98db cut so was curious what it was all about. At the 12db cut it still felt muddy around 200hz. Like the two guitars where building up there. I guess I can try a shallower HP and then notch the low end more. Mixing the low end is the hardest thing for me...it never sounds clear and defined to me no matter what I try. I recorded it under okay conditions so I don't think it's the recording. Might be the arrangement having too many guitar parts, that there isn't a lot of high end in the mix so maybe the low seems exaggerated, or maybe it's the drum sample and not really knowing how to EQ drums very well. I've tried a lot of things from books and YT and they just never sound right in my songs. When I compare my mixes to pro mixes the biggest problem is the lack of definition in the bass and mud, no matter how much I cut down there. Oh well, the original question was answered, so thanks!

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    Also remember that on a hi pass or low pass filter, the frequency you are dialing in is not the center frequency, it is the frequency below which the cutting takes place. So, if you need to cut 200 Hz, you will need to set it for above 200 Hz to cut it.

    Gentler slopes tend to sound more natural, but in order to get a significant cut at a certain frequency, you will need to set it higher than that.

    A steep slope will get rid of more unwanted stuff, but add more at the corner frequency. It's a compromise between shaving things down and chopping them off.
    Jay Walsh
    Farview Recording. I am also the forum spokesmodel for Terasyne Amplification

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    Quote Originally Posted by Massive Master View Post
    *Assuming* it's [dB/Octave] -- If you need anything more that 6 -- or 12 on an extreme scale, figure you've got problems that probably aren't easily solved. When you get into elliptic filters (24dB and more per octave), you sort of need a specific reason for that sort of stuff. Mid-side vinyl cutting for example. Still -- it's a rare occasion where you need something that steep even with vinyl.
    "while bands one and eight also offer cut filters, with slopes all the way up to a whopping 96dB per octave ó thatís very handy if you want to filter off everything below/above a very specific frequency."

    ---------- Steenaudio Website ----------

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    Instead of a steep slope (with the attendant 'boost' at a frequency above the cutoff point), put several instances of EQ on the track, each with a shallow slope, but at the same frequency.
    Mike B My new album on CD Baby: Fact and Fiction
    My Bandcamp site: http://mikebirchmusic.bandcamp.com

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