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Thread: buying a real piano...

  1. #31
    VOXVENDOR's Avatar
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    Should have bought the Casio

  2. #32
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    Haven't bought it yet... But I'm thinking I will buy it somewhere this week, depending on the feedback I get about the high octave-thingy...

  3. #33
    TMHill is offline Newbie
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    (Goes hmm.....)

    I really like Yamaha U1s for their brightness! There's a percussive sound which goes along with the note which makes certain music types really come alive. (Play some Bartok on one, for eg.)

    So - I'm interested to hear that yours has a rounder sound. Probably newer felts on the hammer, rather than anything to do with the wood. Don't have him harden the felts for you - just play them in.

    They're pretty solid pianos, on the whole - so my only concern is how good the recon job was. Tell me more about this top octave. "bad" can mean a number of things. I'm starting to worry that you are buying a piano that has been fitted with pretty poor quality strings. This is so much more exposed by the higher registers. This brings problems down the line, as the whole board relies on the correct stresses being held at each point along the range of strings. So if your upper register strings are crap, it will have a bearing on the rest of the strings later on. Replacing the entire set is expensive, time consuming, and frankly a pain in the arse.

    If you're happy that the strings are ok, then I think I'd say you are buying a good piano for your level, which will stay good enough for you for a long time. (As with any recon, though, don't leave ANY problems to fester - get them sorted as you go along.)

    The price is about right, too - not a bargain, but if you are pleased with the quality of the instrument, then its probably about right.

    Well done on being careful and getting to the right instrument!

    Tom

  4. #34
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    Most piano's are going to sound "good" in the middle registers. It's the upper and lower registers that can tell more about a piano's condition. One thing is, if it was recently restored, and had new strings put on as part of the restoration, the strings could just be "green" and haven't really settled into tuning yet. That would be especially evedent in the higher registers. I agree with Tom's assesment about NOT hardening the hammers. Once you've done something like that, it's nearly impossible to go back.
    Yamaha's do tend to be "bright" instruments though, and if thats the sound you're after, then great! It's interesting that this one seems rounded though. Probably just a product of the way it was voiced, which means to me that the hammers were probably "needled", and that could account for the diminished sustain in the upper registers.
    Ask him who voiced the piano, and try to talk to that guy.
    [SIZE=3][COLOR=RoyalBlue][FONT=Garamond][b][i]"Nobody digs ya music, butcha self"[/i][/FONT][/COLOR][/b][/SIZE]

  5. #35
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    Got this from another place:
    Now that some have aged and mellowed and in turn come to produce a wonderful sound, the attraction to a used Yamaha (esp. with the potential money saved) is serious competition for the company today.
    Which explains the rounder sound. I was very pleased with the sound. Just that highest octave. I'll check if the higher notes maybe have newer strings or anything... Any other way to check the strings or some other things I should notice? The lower notes sounded very good, and had a good long sustain.

    Hardening the felts is just what he proposed for the upper octave, not for the rest of the piano, which sounded very good and consistent. Really allows you to sing very good. I'm pretty confident that it is a good piano, if it sounds and plays consistent after 20 years, it must be. And the technician also did a good job. I'm really curious what the reason for that bad highest octave is. The guy told me most of the piano's have a region where it sounds less good. If it's just the upper octave, it is livable...

    The guy was also more off a musician than the typical salesman in the other shop. He explained alot instead of just trying to sell. We were even discussing just about music for a while. He really did it because he like it... They also told me, if I wanted a new piano, I could go with them to the distributor and choose it myself! It's a smaller shop, but I trust the guy alot more than the big shops...

  6. #36
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    Originally posted by Michael Jones
    Yamaha's do tend to be "bright" instruments though, and if thats the sound you're after, then great! It's interesting that this one seems rounded though. Probably just a product of the way it was voiced, which means to me that the hammers were probably "needled", and that could account for the diminished sustain in the upper registers.
    Ask him who voiced the piano, and try to talk to that guy.
    Is there maybe a way to see this? And is it a bad thing? Or just a matter of taste? I'm gonna ask what adjustements where needed on the piano, what they've done exactly... Good info! Thanks, both of you!

  7. #37
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    I don't think you can tell just by looking. Ask him flat out if the hammers have been needled. If they have, its not a bad thing mind you, thats one of the things that is sometimes done to voice a piano. Its just that, once you punch a hole in that felt, you can't undo it. It could be that thats why he's offering to harden the hammers. Hardening is done by applying an acrylic to the hammers felt.
    [SIZE=3][COLOR=RoyalBlue][FONT=Garamond][b][i]"Nobody digs ya music, butcha self"[/i][/FONT][/COLOR][/b][/SIZE]

  8. #38
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    Ok, I kinda get it. If they've been needled and it sounds good, then it's a good thing. And if that's the reason for the highest octave sounding less good, then I know it's not the strings. So the hardening is not a good idea? Other ideas?

  9. #39
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    Do you know any piano techs? It would be worth it to pay somebody $50 to check it out for you and give you an estimate on any setup costs.

    Like any instrument a piano is only as good as it has been setup to be. A master tuner can make a big difference in the tone and action. There are a lot of adjustments that can be made. If the wood is in good shape you are probably ok.

    One thing to check is that the piano is tuned properly and not a half step down or anything. Older pianos that werent tuned regularly will sometimes not be able to be tuned to spec because the harp wont be able to stand the tension. Same as an old guitar. Not a big deal if you just play the piano by itself but something to consider.

  10. #40
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    Ok, I'll take my pitch fork. I'll ask to which pitch it is tuned, standard or not. Probably is. I already played a few 2nd hand piano's, none of them was setup as good as this one. Even the new piano's at the shop I went before this one were not setup that good. I was really amazed...

    Don't know any piano techs... Really a pitty. I'll hear around some more. Good idea...

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