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Thread: Protecting solder joints (superglue?)

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    Gear_Junky is offline The SCXD Defender
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    Protecting solder joints (superglue?)

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    When making solder joints in electric guitars (i.e. connecting wires to POTs, etc.) would it be a good idea to "coat" the joint with something that would prevent oxidation? First thing that came to mind is superglue.

    Thanks!
    I am a musician trapped in a lazy bum's body :D

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    dementedchord is offline Psychotic State alumni ch
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    dont really think it's an issue but there used to be some stuff called tweak just for that purpose... used to carry it in my audiofool retail days... i think caig may make something similar...
    37.8% of all statistics are made up on the spot...

    hey give a guy some room... people are trying to evolve here... for crying out loud...

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    mshilarious's Avatar
    mshilarious is offline I see people
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gear_Junky View Post
    When making solder joints in electric guitars (i.e. connecting wires to POTs, etc.) would it be a good idea to "coat" the joint with something that would prevent oxidation? First thing that came to mind is superglue.

    Thanks!
    Wow, no don't use superglue. If you ever want to redo the joint, change anything, etc., you'd be burning off the glue which can't be good for you, and it will make a mess of your tip.

    Use a good quality solder and do the joint right, and there should be no troubles. You can DeOx the joints every couple of years if you want, but I wouldn't bother unless there was a problem.

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    Gear_Junky is offline The SCXD Defender
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    Quote Originally Posted by mshilarious View Post
    Wow, no don't use superglue. If you ever want to redo the joint, change anything, etc., you'd be burning off the glue which can't be good for you, and it will make a mess of your tip.

    Use a good quality solder and do the joint right, and there should be no troubles. You can DeOx the joints every couple of years if you want, but I wouldn't bother unless there was a problem.
    yes, i thought of that too and also figured that a good solid joint, even if oxidized on surface, should be good inside. Oh well, just checking

    thx!
    I am a musician trapped in a lazy bum's body :D

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    dementedchord is offline Psychotic State alumni ch
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    Quote Originally Posted by mshilarious View Post
    you'd be burning off the glue which can't be good for you, .

    oooohhh forgot that superglue is a cyanide based chemical... good call MSH...
    37.8% of all statistics are made up on the spot...

    hey give a guy some room... people are trying to evolve here... for crying out loud...

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    gvarko is offline The Boogie Man
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    You could always give a wrap or 2 of electrical tape over the top of the pot. That would add some protection and is easy to remove when needed.
    [url]http://stores.ebay.com/WoodGuarden-Pickguards[/url]
    Helping you sport Solid Wood . . .

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    ggunn is offline Crystal Flavolian
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    Quote Originally Posted by gvarko View Post
    You could always give a wrap or 2 of electrical tape over the top of the pot. That would add some protection and is easy to remove when needed.
    Protection from what? Any oxidation that happens to solder is on the surface only, and if oxidation can get to the solder joint itself (where the solder and the metals being soldered meet) then it's a bad solder joint to start with. This can happen when you move the wires around before the solder has completely cooled, which opens up tiny cracks in the solder where air and moisture can get in. This is a "cold solder joint" and it can take years for the connection to fail. Tape wouldn't help it.

    Make your solder joints correctly and you won't need to protect them.

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    Fusioninspace is offline Dedicated Member
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    Here's what I look for in a good solder joint:

    1. No "balling" up.
    2. The solder should melt into/onto the surface of the wires/contact. So all of the metal is a continous-smooth-flow look to it.

    If it's done right, there should never be a need to do it again. But it's easy to undo when it's time to swap components.

    The only problem I routinely have with soldering is overheating something and melting part of the pot/connector

    I'm getting better - but not perfect.

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    dementedchord is offline Psychotic State alumni ch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fusioninspace View Post
    The only problem I routinely have with soldering is overheating something and melting part of the pot/connector .
    it's a matter of practice and a variable temp iron helps....
    37.8% of all statistics are made up on the spot...

    hey give a guy some room... people are trying to evolve here... for crying out loud...

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    gvarko's Avatar
    gvarko is offline The Boogie Man
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    Protection from what? Any oxidation that happens to solder is on the surface only, and if oxidation can get to the solder joint itself (where the solder and the metals being soldered meet) then it's a bad solder joint to start with. This can happen when you move the wires around before the solder has completely cooled, which opens up tiny cracks in the solder where air and moisture can get in. This is a "cold solder joint" and it can take years for the connection to fail. Tape wouldn't help it.

    Make your solder joints correctly and you won't need to protect them.
    I have only done this when I have active pups installed and fear the battery may hit the connections. I wasn't expecting protection from oxidation w/ tape..
    [url]http://stores.ebay.com/WoodGuarden-Pickguards[/url]
    Helping you sport Solid Wood . . .

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